Machine Learning based Fuzzy Matching using AWS Glue ML Transforms

Machine Learning Transforms in AWS Glue

Machine Learning Transforms in AWS Glue

AWS Glue provides machine learning capabilities to create custom transforms to do Machine Learning based fuzzy matching to deduplicate and cleanse your data. For this we are going to use a transform named FindMatches. The FindMatches transform enables you to identify duplicate or matching records in your dataset, even when the records do not have a common unique identifier and no fields match exactly. This will not require writing any code or knowing how machine learning works. For more details about ML Transforms, please go through the docs.

Creating a Machine Learning Transform with AWS Glue

This article walks you through the actions to create and manage a machine learning (ML) transform using AWS Glue. I assume that you are familiar with using the AWS Glue console to add crawlers and jobs and edit scripts. You should also be familiar with finding and downloading files on the Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) console.

In case you are just starting out on AWS Glue, I have explained how to create an AWS Glue Crawler and Glue Job from scratch in one of my earlier articles.
The source data used in this blog is a hypothetical file named customers_data.csv. A second file, label_file.csv, is an example of a labeling file that contains both matching and nonmatching records used to teach the transform.

Step 1: Crawl the Data using AWS Glue Crawler

At the outset, crawl the source data from the CSV file in S3 to create a metadata table in the AWS Glue Data Catalog. I created a crawler pointing to the source location (s3://bucketname/data/ml-transform/customers/).

In case you are just starting out on the AWS Glue crawler, I have explained how to create one from scratch in one of my earlier articles. If you run this crawler, it creates a customers table in the specified database (ml-transform).

Step 2: Add a Machine Learning Transform

Next, add a machine learning transform that is based on the schema of your data source table created by the above crawler.

  • On the AWS Glue console, in the navigation pane, choose ML Transforms, Add transform.
    1. For transform name, enter ml-transform. This is the name of the transform that is used to find matches in the source data.
    2. Choose an IAM role that has permission to access Amazon S3 and AWS Glue API operations.

Choose Worker type and Maximum capacity as per the requirements.
3. For Data source, choose the table that was created in the earlier step. In this, the table named customers in database ml-transform.
4. For Primary key, choose the primary key column for the table, email.

  • Choose Finish.

Step 3: How to Teach Your Machine Learning Transform

Next, teach the machine learning transform using the sample labeling file.
You can’t use a machine language transform in an extract, transform, and load (ETL) job until its status is Ready for use. To get your transform ready, you must teach it how to identify matching and non-matching records by providing examples of matching and non-matching records. To teach your transform, you can Generate a label file, add labels, and then Upload label file.

For this article, the label file I have used is label_file.csv

  • On the AWS Glue console, in the navigation pane, choose ML Transforms.
  • Choose the earlier created transform, and then choose Action, Teach.
  • If you don’t have the label file, choose I do not have labels, you can Generate a label file, add labels, and then Upload label file.

If you have the label file, choose I have labels, then choose Upload labelling file from S3.
Choose an Amazon S3 path to the sample labeling file in the current AWS Region. (s3://bucketname/data/ml-transform/labels/label_file.csv) with the option to overwrite existing labels. The labeling file must be located in S3 in the same Region as the AWS Glue console.

When you upload a labeling file, a task is started in AWS Glue to add or overwrite the labels used to teach the transform how to process the data source.

  • Choose Finish, and return to the ML transforms list.

Step 4: Estimate the Quality of ML Transform

What is Labeling?

The act of labeling is creating a labeling file (such as in a spreadsheet) and adding identifiers, or labels, into the label column that identifies matching and non-matching records. It is important to have a clear and consistent definition of a match in your source data. AWS Glue learns from which records you designate as matches (or not) and uses your decisions to learn how to find duplicate records.

Next, you can estimate the quality of your machine learning transform. The quality depends on how much labeling you have done.

  • On the AWS Glue console, in the navigation pane, choose ML Transforms.
  • Choose the earlier created transform, and choose the Estimate quality tab. This tab displays the current quality estimates, if available, for the transform.
  • Choose Estimate quality to start a task to estimate the quality of the transform. The accuracy of the quality estimate is based on the labeling of the source data.
  • Navigate to the History tab. In this pane, task runs are listed for the transform, including the Estimating quality task. For more details about the run, choose Logs. Check that the run status is Succeeded when it finishes.

Step 5: Create and Run a Job with ML Transform

In this step, we use your machine learning transform to add and run a job in AWS Glue. When the transform is Ready for use, we can use it in an ETL job.

On the AWS Glue console, in the navigation pane, choose Jobs.

Choose Add job.

In case you are just starting out on AWS Glue ETL Job, I have explained how to create one from scratch in one of my earlier articles.

  • For Name, choose the example job in this tutorial, ml-transform.
  • Choose an IAM role that has permission to access Amazon S3 and AWS Glue API operations.
  • For ETL language, choose Spark 2.2, Python 2. Machine learning transforms are currently not supported for Spark 2.4.
  • For Data source, choose the table created in Step 1. The data source you choose must match the machine learning transform data source schema.
  • For Transform type, choose to Find matching records to create a job using a machine learning transform.
  • For Transform, choose transform created in step 2, the machine learning transform used by the job.
  • For Create tables in your data target, choose to create tables with the following properties.
    • Data store type — Amazon S3
    • Format — CSV
    • Compression type — None
    • Target path — The Amazon S3 path where the output of the job is written (in the current console AWS Region)

Choose Save job and edit script to display the script editor page. The script looks like the following. After you edit the script, choose Save.

import sys
from awsglue.transforms import *
from awsglue.utils import getResolvedOptions
from pyspark.context import SparkContext
from awsglue.context import GlueContext
from awsglue.job import Job
from awsglueml.transforms import FindMatches

## @params: [JOB_NAME]
args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME'])

sc = SparkContext()
glueContext = GlueContext(sc)
spark = glueContext.spark_session
job = Job(glueContext)
job.init(args['JOB_NAME'], args)
## @type: DataSource
## @args: [database = "ml_transforms", table_name = "customers", transformation_ctx = "datasource0"]
## @return: datasource0
## @inputs: []
datasource0 = glueContext.create_dynamic_frame.from_catalog(database = "ml_transforms", table_name = "customers", transformation_ctx = "datasource0")
## @type: ResolveChoice
## @args: [choice = "MATCH_CATALOG", database = "ml_transforms", table_name = "customers", transformation_ctx = "resolvechoice1"]
## @return: resolvechoice1
## @inputs: [frame = datasource0]
resolvechoice1 = ResolveChoice.apply(frame = datasource0, choice = "MATCH_CATALOG", database = "ml_transforms", table_name = "customers", transformation_ctx = "resolvechoice1")
## @type: FindMatches
## @args: [transformId = "eacb9a1ffbc686f61387f63", emitFusion = false, survivorComparisonField = "<primary_id>", transformation_ctx = "findmatches2"]
## @return: findmatches2
## @inputs: [frame = resolvechoice1]
findmatches2 = FindMatches.apply(frame = resolvechoice1, transformId = "eacb9a1ffbc686f61387f63", transformation_ctx = "findmatches2")
## @type: DataSink
## @args: [connection_type = "s3", connection_options = {"path": "s3://bucket-name/data/ml-transforms/output/"}, format = "csv", transformation_ctx = "datasink3"]
## @return: datasink3
## @inputs: [frame = findmatches2]
datasink3 = glueContext.write_dynamic_frame.from_options(frame = findmatches2, connection_type = "s3", connection_options = {"path": "s3:/<bucket-name>/data/ml-transforms/output/"}, format = "csv", transformation_ctx = "datasink3")
job.commit()

Choose Run job to start the job run. Check the status of the job in the jobs list. When the job finishes, in the ML transform, History tab, there is a new Run ID row added of type ETL job. 

Navigate to the Jobs, History tab. In this pane, job runs are listed. For more details about the run, choose Logs. Check that the run status is Succeeded when it finishes.

Step 6: Verify Output Data from Amazon S3 in Amazon Athena

In this step, check the output of the job run in the Amazon S3 bucket that you chose when you added the job. You can create a table in the Glue Data catalog pointing to the output location, just like the way we crawled the source data in Step 1. You can then query the data in Athena.

However, the Find matches transform adds another column named match_id to identify matching records in the output. Rows with the same match_id are considered matching records.

If you don’t find any matches, you can continue to teach the transform by adding more labels.

Thanks for the read and look forward to your comments

This story is authored by PV Subbareddy. Subbareddy is a Big Data Engineer specializing on AWS Big Data Services and Apache Spark Ecosystem.

Creating a Chatbot for Healthcare in React Native using Dialogflow

In this blog, we shall learn how to build an AI virtual assistant or a Chatbot using React Native and Dialogflow API.

Why are chatbots important?
A chatbot is a piece of software that helps in conducting a conversation through voice based or textual methods. Chatbots offer companies new opportunities to improve the customer engagement process and operational efficiency by reducing the typical cost of customer service.

Image result for dialogflow

What is Dialogflow?
Dialogflow (previously known as API.AI) is a Natural Language Processing (NLP) platform which can be greatly helpful to build conversational applications for a company’s customers in various languages and also across multiple platforms. Dialogflow enables developers to create text-based and voice conversation interfaces for responding to customer queries in different languages.

Why Dialogflow?
There are different chatbot SDK’s like Dialogflow, Amazon Lex, IBM Watson, Microsoft Bot Framework etc. The reasons to why we chose to use Dialogflow are:

  1. Dialogflow supports multiple platforms.
  2. Dialogflow supports all the devices like wearables, phones and other devices.
  3. Dialogflow also supports multiple languages.

How Dialogflow works?
In Dialogflow, the typical flow of any conversation involves these steps:

  1. The user providing an input.
  2. Dialogflow agent parsing that input based on the intent.
  3. Agent returning a response to the user.

Setting up Dialogflow account:

Navigate to console in the official website. After navigating to console you will be prompted to sign in with Google, go ahead and sign-in. After successfully signing in you can see a dashboard.

Before we dive into the platform and start building the bot/agent, let us learn about the terms used in Dialogflow.

After signing in, you could see a Create Agent tab. An agent is nothing but the bot that you would like to create. Give a name of your choice and click on the Create button. After creating successfully you could see multiple tabs on the left side of the screen like:

  1. Intents
  2. Entities
  3. Fulfillment etc

Intents:
An Intent is a specific action that the user can invoke by using one of the defined terms in the Dialogflow console. 

For example, the user could ask “What’s the time?” or “What is today’s date?” if these terms are defined within the console, then they will be detected by Dialogflow and intents that are defined under will get triggered.

You can create an intent by clicking on create intent as shown below.

You shall see some default intents already available. We can create the new intents here.

Entities:
An Entity is a property which can be used by Dialogflow to answer the request from the user. The entity will usually be a keyword within the request such as a name, date, time etc. 

Dialogflow has a rich set of predefined entities and also has an option that enables the developer to define custom entities as well.

Fulfillment:
When the user provides the input, Dialogflow needs to process the user input which might contain entities as well. Hence Dialogflow needs to request the information from web-hook so as to fulfill the users request. The input provided by the user along with entities is then sent to the web-hook so that the required information can be retrieved. Once the Dialogflow receives the information from web-hook it sends the response back to the user in the desired manner.

For example, if the user wants to know about weather conditions, a web-hook could be used to get info about weather and pass it on to the user.

Response:
It is the content which Dialogflow sends back to the user once the user’s query is processed.

Creating a ChatBot for Health care:

Now that we have learnt about some basic terms of Dialogflow, let us start building a chatbot (in this case Healthbot) which helps the user (patient) to schedule an appointment with a specific doctor in an organization.

Let’s go ahead and create an agent first. Here we are creating an agent with the name HealthBot.

After clicking the create button, the HealthBot agent would be created. It would look like below.

You could see some default intents there. We can create our own intents here. So, let’s move forward and start creating the intents.

The intent we will be creating here is “Schedule an Appointment”.

Save the intent after creating. In the Training Phrases section, we can add our own training phrases to train the agent.

When we add a particular training phrase , Dialogflow would look for predefined entities in the phrase, if found it will highlight them as shown.

Add few other relative training phrases and click on save.

Next in the Action and Parameters section we can make the @sys.person, @sys.date, @sys.time as required by checking on the Required checkbox. We can also define the prompts for the required fields so that if the user does not provide any one of them the defined prompt will be shown up asking the user to provide the required parameters.

The prompts for the entities could be defined by clicking define prompts under Prompts. Below are the prompts for the respective entities.

Next we have to add the response in the Response section.

After receiving all the required parameters from the user , we can phrase a response like shown.

Now we have to create a front end app using React Native which would communicate with the HealthBot agent.

Let’s go to React Native Docs, select React Native CLI Quickstart and select the appropriate development OS and the target OS as Android, as we are going to build an android application. 

Follow the docs for installing dependencies, then create a new react native application. Use the command line interface to create a new react native project.

react-native init <project-name>

By using the below commands you can run the app on android device. You could see the default welcome page. 

cd <project-name>
Npm install
React-native run-android

Note:  If you face an issue like “Failed to install the app. Make sure you have the Android development environment set up”, just traverse to <project-name>/android folder and create a file named local.properties and add the Android SDK path in it as shown here.

sdk.dir = Your Android SDK Path

We also need to install some dependencies using below command.

npm install react-native-gifted-chat
react-native-dialogflow -save

We are using react-native-gifted-chat package as it provides a customizable and complete chat UI interface.

We are also using react-native-dialogflow so that we can bridge our app with Google Dialogflow’s SDK. 

For our app to communicate with Dialogflow agent, we need to configure few things. For that create any .js file in your project root folder (in this env.js).
We need to configure few values in env.js file.

To get the values click on the Service Account link as shown in the image.
You can get this by clicking on the gear icon present beside the agent name on the left side of the screen.

After clicking the link , you would be shown a table called Service accounts for project “<Agent Name>”. Click on Actions and select create key option from there. A prompt will appear asking to choose an option. Select JSON and click on create. A json file would be downloaded. Just copy the contents of the json file and add it in env.js.

Your env.js file would look like below.

env.js

export const dialogflowConfig = {
  "type": "service_account",
  "project_id": "Health-bot",
  "private_key_id": "xxxx",
  "private_key": "-----BEGIN PRIVATE KEY-----\n xxxx\n-----END PRIVATE KEY-----\n",
  "client_email": "xxxx",
  "client_id": "xxxx",
  "auth_uri": "xxxx",
  "token_uri": "xxxx",
  "auth_provider_x509_cert_url": "xxxx",
  "client_x509_cert_url": "xxxx"
}

Now go to <project-name> directory and open App.js. Modify the content of App.js as below.

App.js

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import {View} from 'react-native';
import { GiftedChat } from 'react-native-gifted-chat';
import { Dialogflow_V2 } from 'react-native-dialogflow';
import { dialogflowConfig } from './env';

const BOT_USER = {
  _id: 2,
  name: 'Health Bot',
  avatar: 'https://previews.123rf.com/images/iulika1/iulika11909/iulika1190900021/129697389-medical-worker-health-professional-avatar-medical-staff-doctor-icon-isolated-on-white-background-vec.jpg'
};
class App extends Component {

  state = {
    messages: [
      {
        _id: 1,
        text: 'Hi! I am the Healthbot 🤖.\n\nHow may I help you today?',
        createdAt: new Date(),
        user: BOT_USER
      }
    ]
  };

  componentDidMount() {
    Dialogflow_V2.setConfiguration(
      dialogflowConfig.client_email,
      dialogflowConfig.private_key,
      Dialogflow_V2.LANG_ENGLISH_US,
      dialogflowConfig.project_id
    );
  }

  onSend(messages = []) {
    this.setState(previousState => ({
      messages: GiftedChat.append(previousState.messages, messages)
    }));

    let message = messages[0].text;
    Dialogflow_V2.requestQuery(
      message,
      result => this.handleGoogleResponse(result),
      error => console.log(error)
    );
  }

  handleGoogleResponse(result) {
    let text = result.queryResult.fulfillmentMessages[0].text.text[0];
    this.sendBotResponse(text);
  }

  sendBotResponse(text) {
    let msg = {
      _id: this.state.messages.length + 1,
      text,
      createdAt: new Date(),
      user: BOT_USER
    };

    this.setState(previousState => ({
      messages: GiftedChat.append(previousState.messages, [msg])
    }));
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <View style={{ flex: 1, backgroundColor: '#fff' }}>
        <GiftedChat
          messages={this.state.messages}
          onSend={messages => this.onSend(messages)}
          user={{
            _id: 1
          }}
        />
      </View>
    );
  }
}
export default App;

When the App.js file renders, the first thing it renders is componentDidMount() where we set the configuration of Dialogflow as given below.


componentDidMount() {
    Dialogflow_V2.setConfiguration(
      dialogflowConfig.client_email,
      dialogflowConfig.private_key,
      Dialogflow_V2.LANG_ENGLISH_US,
      dialogflowConfig.project_id
    );
  }

When you click on send , it will trigger the onSend() method where the user message gets stored in the state variable and we will send a request to Dialogflow using Dialogflow_V2.requestQuery. If the response is successful, handleGoogleResponse() method gets triggered.

onSend(messages = []) {
    this.setState(previousState => ({
      messages: GiftedChat.append(previousState.messages, messages)
    }));

    let message = messages[0].text;
    Dialogflow_V2.requestQuery(
      message,
      result => this.handleGoogleResponse(result),
      error => console.log(error)
    );
  }

handleGoogleResponse() will get the text from the response and triggers sendBotResponse() method where it will set the state to response as shown below

handleGoogleResponse(result) {
    let text = result.queryResult.fulfillmentMessages[0].text.text[0];
    this.sendBotResponse(text);
  }

  sendBotResponse(text) {
      let msg = {
        _id: this.state.messages.length + 1,
        text,
        createdAt: new Date(),
        user: BOT_USER
      };

      this.setState(previousState => ({
        messages: GiftedChat.append(previousState.messages, [msg])
      }));
    }

Below are the images of the app running on an Android device.

That’s it folks, we hope it was fun and useful.

This story is authored by Dheeraj Kumar and Santosh Kumar. Dheeraj is a software engineer specializing in React Native and React based frontend development. Santosh specializes on Cloud Services based development.

Text Detection in React Native App using AWS Rekognition

In this story, we are going to build an app for detecting text in an image using Amazon Rekognition in React Native.

You shall learn how to build a mobile application in React Native, which talks to AWS API Gateway. This API endpoint is configured with a lambda that stores the sent image in S3 and detects the text using AWS Rekognition and sends back the response.

Installing dependencies:

Let’s go to React Native Docs, select React Native CLI Quickstart and select our Development OS and Target OS -> Android, as we are going to build an android application.

Follow the docs for installing dependencies, after installing create a new React Native Application. Use the command line interface to generate a new React Native project called text-detection.

react-native init text-detection

Preparing the Android device:

We shall need an Android device to run our React Native Android app. This can be either a physical Android device, or more commonly, we can use an Android Virtual Device (AVD) which allows us to emulate an Android device on our computer (using Android Studio).

Either way, we shall need to prepare the device to run Android apps for development. If you have a physical Android device, you can use it for development in place of an AVD by connecting it to your computer using a USB cable and following the instructions here.

If you are using a virtual device follow this link. I shall be using physical android device.
Now go to command line and run react-native run-android inside your React Native app directory:

cd text-detection
react-native run-android

If everything is set up correctly, you should see your new app running in your physical device or Android emulator.

API Creation in AWS Console:

Before going further, create an API in your AWS console following this link. Once you are done with creating API come back to the React Native application. Now, go to your project directory and Replace your App.js file with the following code.
Now, go to your project directory and Replace your App.js file with the following code.

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import { StyleSheet, View, Text, TextInput, Image, ScrollView, TouchableHighlight } from 'react-native';
import ImagePicker from "react-native-image-picker";
import Amplify, {API} from "aws-amplify";
Amplify.configure({
    API: {
        endpoints: [
            {
                name: <Your API name>,
                Endpoint: <Your end-point url>
            }
        ]
    }
});

class Registration extends Component {
  
    constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.state =  {
            imageName : '',
            capturedImage : '',
            detectedText: []
        };
    }

    captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
        ImagePicker.showImagePicker({title: "Pick an Image", maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600}, (response) => {
            console.log('Response - ', response);
            alert(response)
            if (response.didCancel) {
                console.log('User cancelled image picker');
            } else if (response.error) {
                console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
            } else if (response.customButton) {
                console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
            } else {
                // You can also display the image using data:
                const source = { uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data };
            
                this.setState({capturedImage: response.uri, base64String: source.uri });
            }
        });
    }

    submitButtonHandler = () => {
        if (this.state.imageName == '' || this.state.imageName == undefined || this.state.imageName == null) {
            alert("Please Enter the image name");
        } else if (this.state.capturedImage == '' || this.state.capturedImage == undefined || this.state.capturedImage == null) {
            alert("Please Capture the Image");
        } else {
            console.log("submiting")
            const apiName = "faceRekognition";
            const path = "/detecttext";
            const init = {
                headers: {
                    'Accept': 'application/json',
                    "Content-Type": "application/x-amz-json-1.1"
                },
                body: JSON.stringify({
                    Image: this.state.base64String,
                    name: this.state.imageName
                })
            }

            API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
                console.log("Response Data is : " + JSON.stringify(response));

                if (JSON.stringify(response.TextDetections.length) > 0) {

                    this.setState({
                        detectedText: response.TextDetections
                    })
                    
                } else {
                    alert("Please Try Again.")
                }
            });
        }
    }
    
  
    render() {
        console.log(this.state.detectedText)
        var texts = this.state.detectedText.map(text => {
            return <Text style={{textAlign: 'center'}}>{text.DetectedText}</Text>
        })
        
        return (
            <View>
                <ScrollView>
                    <Text style= {{ fontSize: 20, color: "#000", textAlign: 'center', marginBottom: 15, marginTop: 10 }}>Text Image</Text>
                
                    <TextInput
                        placeholder="file name"
                        onChangeText={imageName => this.setState({imageName: imageName})}
                        underlineColorAndroid='transparent'
                        style={styles.TextInputStyleClass}
                    />

                    {this.state.capturedImage !== "" && <View style={styles.imageholder} >
                        <Image source={{uri : this.state.capturedImage}} style={styles.previewImage} />
                    </View>}
                    <View>
<br/>
                        {texts}
                    </View>
                    <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.captureButton]} onPress={this.captureImageButtonHandler}>
                        <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Capture Image</Text>
                    </TouchableHighlight>

                    <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.submitButton]} onPress={this.submitButtonHandler}>
                        <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Submit</Text>
                    </TouchableHighlight>
                    
                </ScrollView>
            </View>
        );
    }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
    TextInputStyleClass: {
      textAlign: 'center',
      marginBottom: 7,
      height: 40,
      borderWidth: 1,
      margin: 10,
      borderColor: '#D0D0D0',
      borderRadius: 5 ,
    },
    inputContainer: {
      borderBottomColor: '#F5FCFF',
      backgroundColor: '#FFFFFF',
      borderRadius:30,
      borderBottomWidth: 1,
      width:300,
      height:45,
      marginBottom:20,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems:'center'
    },
    buttonContainer: {
      height:45,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems: 'center',
      justifyContent: 'center',
    //   marginBottom:20,
      width:"80%",
      borderRadius:30,
    //   marginTop: 20,
      margin: 20,
    },
    captureButton: {
      backgroundColor: "#337ab7",
      width: 350,
    },
    buttonText: {
      color: 'white',
      fontWeight: 'bold',
    },
    horizontal: {
      flexDirection: 'row',
      justifyContent: 'space-around',
      padding: 10
    },
    submitButton: {
      backgroundColor: "#C0C0C0",
      width: 350,
      marginTop: 5,
    },
    imageholder: {
      borderWidth: 1,
      borderColor: "grey",
      backgroundColor: "#eee",
      width: "50%",
      height: 150,
      marginTop: 10,
      marginLeft: 90,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems:'center'
    },
    previewImage: {
      width: "100%",
      height: "100%",
    }
});

export default Registration;

In the above code, we are configuring amplify with the API name and Endpoint URL that you created as shown below.

Amplify.configure({
 API: {
   endpoints: [
     {
       name: '<Your-API-Name>, 
       endpoint:'<Endpoint-URL>',
     },
   ],
 },
});

By clicking the capture button it will trigger the captureImageButtonHandler function. It will then ask the user to take a picture or select from file system. When user captures the image or selects from file system, we will store that image in the state as shown below.

captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
   this.setState({
     objectName: '',
   });
 
   ImagePicker.showImagePicker(
     {title: 'Pick an Image', maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600},
     response => {
       console.log('Response = ', response);
       if (response.didCancel) {
         console.log('User cancelled image picker');
       } else if (response.error) {
         console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
       } else if (response.customButton) {
         console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
       } else {
         // You can also display the image using data:
         const source = {uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data};
         this.setState({
           capturedImage: response.uri,
           base64String: source.uri,
         });
       }
     },
   );
 };

After capturing the image we will preview that image. By Clicking on submit button, submitButtonHandler function will get triggered where we will send the image to the end point as shown below.

submitButtonHandler = () => {
        if (this.state.imageName == '' || this.state.imageName == undefined || this.state.imageName == null) {
            alert("Please Enter the image name");
        } else if (this.state.capturedImage == '' || this.state.capturedImage == undefined || this.state.capturedImage == null) {
            alert("Please Capture the Image");
        } else {
            console.log("submiting")
            const apiName = "faceRekognition";
            const path = "/detecttext";
            const init = {
                headers: {
                    'Accept': 'application/json',
                    "Content-Type": "application/x-amz-json-1.1"
                },
                body: JSON.stringify({
                    Image: this.state.base64String,
                    name: this.state.imageName
                })
            }

            API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
                console.log("Response Data is : " + JSON.stringify(response));
                if (JSON.stringify(response.TextDetections.length) > 0) {
                    this.setState({
                        detectedText: response.TextDetections
                    })
                    
                } else {
                    alert("Please Try Again.")
                }
            });
        }
    }

Lambda Function:

Add the following code into your lambda function that you created in your AWS Console.

const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
var rekognition = new AWS.Rekognition();
var s3Bucket = new AWS.S3( { params: {Bucket: "detect-text-in-image"} } );
var fs = require('fs');

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    let parsedData = JSON.parse(event)
    let encodedImage = parsedData.Image;
    var filePath = parsedData.name;
    let buf = new Buffer(encodedImage.replace(/^data:image\/\w+;base64,/, ""),'base64')
    var data = {
        Key: filePath, 
        Body: buf,
        ContentEncoding: 'base64',
        ContentType: 'image/jpeg'
    };
    s3Bucket.putObject(data, function(err, data){
        if (err) { 
            console.log('Error uploading data: ', data);
            callback(err, null);
        } else {
            var params = {
              Document: { /* required */
                Bytes: buf ,
                S3Object: {
                  Bucket: 'detect-text-in-image',
                  Name: filePath,
                //   Version: 'STRING_VALUE'
                }
              },
              FeatureTypes: ["TABLES" | "FORMS"]
            };

            var params = {
              Image: {
              S3Object: {
                Bucket: "detect-text-in-image", 
                Name: filePath
              }
              }
              };
            rekognition.detectText(params, function(err, data) {
                if (err){
                    console.log(err, err.stack);
                    callback(err)
                }
                else{
                    console.log(data);
                    callback(null, data);
                }
            });
        }
    });
};

In the above code, we would receive the image from React Native which we are storing in S3 Bucket. The stored image is sent to Amazon Recognition which has detectText method that detects the text in the image and sends the response with the detected text in JSON format.

Note: Make sure you have given permissions to the IAM role to access AWS Rekognition’s detectText API.

Here is how your home screen looks like:

Once you capture an image you can see a preview of that image as shown below.

On submitting the captured image with file name you can see the text in that image as shown below:

That’s all folks! I hope it was helpful.

This story is authored by Venu Vaka. He is a software engineer specializing in ReactJS and AWS Cloud.

Object Detection in React Native App using AWS Rekognition

In this post, we are going to build a React Native app for detecting objects from an image using Amazon Rekognition.

Here we will capture an Image or Select it from file system. We will send that image to API Gateway where it triggers the Lambda Function which will store in S3 Bucket. The stored image is sent to Amazon Recognition which will detect the objects from the image.

Installing dependencies:

Let’s go to React Native Docs, select React Native CLI Quickstart and select our appropriate Development OS and the Target OS as Android, as we are going to build an android application.

Follow the docs for installing dependencies, then create a new React Native Application. Use the command line interface to generate a new React Native project called ObjectDetection.

react-native init ObjectDetection

Preparing the Android device:

We shall need an Android device to run our React Native Android app. This can be either a physical Android device, or more commonly, we can use an Android Virtual Device (AVD) which allows us to emulate an Android device on our computer (using Android Studio).

Either way, we shall need to prepare the device to run Android apps for development. If you have a physical Android device, you can use it for development in place of an AVD by connecting it to your computer using a USB cable and following the instructions here.

If you are using a virtual device follow this link. I shall be using a physical Android device.

Now go to the command line and run react-native run-android inside your React Native app directory

cd ObjectDetection && react-native run-android

If everything is set up correctly, you should see your new app running on your physical device or Android emulator.

API Creation in AWS Console: 

Before going further, create an API in your AWS console following this link.
Once your done with creating API come back to the React Native application.
Now, go to your project directory and Replace your App.js file with the following code.

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import {
 StyleSheet,
 View,
 Text,
 TextInput,
 Image,
 ScrollView,
 TouchableHighlight,
} from 'react-native';
import ImagePicker from 'react-native-image-picker';
import Amplify, {API} from 'aws-amplify';
import Video from 'react-native-video';
 
// Amplify configuration for API-Gateway
Amplify.configure({
 API: {
   endpoints: [
     {
       name: 'LabellingAPI',   //your api name
       endpoint:’<Endpoint-URL>’, //Your Endpoint URL
     },
   ],
 },
});
 
class Registration extends Component {
 constructor(props) {
   super(props);
   this.state = {
     username: 'storeImage.png',
     userId: '',
     image: '',
     capturedImage: '',
     objectName: '',
   };
 }
 
// It selects image from filesystem or capture from camera
 captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
   this.setState({
     objectName: '',
   });
 
   ImagePicker.showImagePicker(
     {title: 'Pick an Image', maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600},
     response => {
       console.log('Response = ', response);
       if (response.didCancel) {
         console.log('User cancelled image picker');
       } else if (response.error) {
         console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
       } else if (response.customButton) {
         console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
       } else {
         // You can also display the image using data:
         const source = {uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data};
         this.setState({
           capturedImage: response.uri,
           base64String: source.uri,
         });
       }
     },
   );
 };
 
// this method triggers when you click submit. If the image is valid then It will send the image to API Gateway. 
 submitButtonHandler = () => {
   if (
     this.state.capturedImage == '' ||
     this.state.capturedImage == undefined ||
     this.state.capturedImage == null
   ) {
     alert('Please Capture the Image');
   } else {
     const apiName = 'LabellingAPI';
     const path = '/storeimage';
     const init = {
       headers: {
         Accept: 'application/json',
         'Content-Type': 'application/x-amz-json-1.1',
       },
       body: JSON.stringify({
         Image: this.state.base64String,
         name: 'storeImage.png',
       }),
     };
 
     API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
       if (JSON.stringify(response.Labels.length) > 0) {
         this.setState({
           objectName: response.Labels[0].Name,
         });
       } else {
         alert('Please Try Again.');
       }
     });
   }
 };
 
 render() {
   if (this.state.image !== '') {
   }
   return (
     <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
       <ScrollView>
         <Text
           style={{
             fontSize: 20,
             color: '#000',
             textAlign: 'center',
             marginBottom: 15,
             marginTop: 10,
           }}>
           Capture Image
         </Text>
         {this.state.capturedImage !== '' && (
           <View style={styles.imageholder}>
             <Image
               source={{uri: this.state.capturedImage}}
               style={styles.previewImage}
             />
           </View>
         )}
         {this.state.objectName ? (
           <TextInput
             underlineColorAndroid="transparent"
             style={styles.TextInputStyleClass}
             value={this.state.objectName}
           />
         ) : null}
         <TouchableHighlight
           style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.captureButton]}
           onPress={this.captureImageButtonHandler}>
           <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Capture Image</Text>
         </TouchableHighlight>
 
         <TouchableHighlight
           style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.submitButton]}
           onPress={this.submitButtonHandler}>
           <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Submit</Text>
         </TouchableHighlight>
       </ScrollView>
     </View>
   );
 }
}
 
const styles = StyleSheet.create({
 TextInputStyleClass: {
   textAlign: 'center',
   marginBottom: 7,
   height: 40,
   borderWidth: 1,
   marginLeft: 90,
   width: '50%',
   justifyContent: 'center',
   borderColor: '#D0D0D0',
   borderRadius: 5,
 },
 inputContainer: {
   borderBottomColor: '#F5FCFF',
   backgroundColor: '#FFFFFF',
   borderRadius: 30,
   borderBottomWidth: 1,
   width: 300,
   height: 45,
   marginBottom: 20,
   flexDirection: 'row',
   alignItems: 'center',
 },
 buttonContainer: {
   height: 45,
   flexDirection: 'row',
   alignItems: 'center',
   justifyContent: 'center',
   marginBottom: 20,
   width: '80%',
   borderRadius: 30,
   marginTop: 20,
   marginLeft: 5,
 },
 captureButton: {
   backgroundColor: '#337ab7',
   width: 350,
 },
 buttonText: {
   color: 'white',
   fontWeight: 'bold',
 },
 horizontal: {
   flexDirection: 'row',
   justifyContent: 'space-around',
   padding: 10,
 },
 submitButton: {
   backgroundColor: '#C0C0C0',
   width: 350,
   marginTop: 5,
 },
 imageholder: {
   borderWidth: 1,
   borderColor: 'grey',
   backgroundColor: '#eee',
   width: '50%',
   height: 150,
   marginTop: 10,
   marginLeft: 90,
   flexDirection: 'row',
   alignItems: 'center',
 },
 previewImage: {
   width: '100%',
   height: '100%',
 },
});
 
export default Registration;

In the above code, we are configuring amplify with the API name and Endpoint URL that you created as shown below.

Amplify.configure({
 API: {
   endpoints: [
     {
       name: '<Your-API-Name>, 
       endpoint:’<Endpoint-URL>’,
     },
   ],
 },
});

By clicking the capture button it will trigger the captureImageButtonHandler function. It will then ask the user to take a picture or select from file system. When user captures the image or selects from file system, we will store that image in the state as shown below.

captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
   this.setState({
     objectName: '',
   });
 
   ImagePicker.showImagePicker(
     {title: 'Pick an Image', maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600},
     response => {
       console.log('Response = ', response);
       if (response.didCancel) {
         console.log('User cancelled image picker');
       } else if (response.error) {
         console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
       } else if (response.customButton) {
         console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
       } else {
         // You can also display the image using data:
         const source = {uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data};
         this.setState({
           capturedImage: response.uri,
           base64String: source.uri,
         });
       }
     },
   );
 };

After capturing the image we will preview that image. By Clicking on submit button, submitButtonHandler function will get triggered where we will send the image to the end point as shown below.

submitButtonHandler = () => {
   if (
     this.state.capturedImage == '' ||
     this.state.capturedImage == undefined ||
     this.state.capturedImage == null
   ) {
     alert('Please Capture the Image');
   } else {
     const apiName = 'LabellingAPI';
     const path = '/storeimage';
     const init = {
       headers: {
         Accept: 'application/json',
         'Content-Type': 'application/x-amz-json-1.1',
       },
       body: JSON.stringify({
         Image: this.state.base64String,
         name: 'storeImage.png',
       }),
     };
 
     API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
       if (JSON.stringify(response.Labels.length) > 0) {
         this.setState({
           objectName: response.Labels[0].Name,
         });
       } else {
         alert('Please Try Again.');
       }
     });
   }
 };

Lambda Function:

Add the following code into your lambda function that you created in your AWS Console.

const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
var rekognition = new AWS.Rekognition()
var s3Bucket = new AWS.S3( { params: {Bucket: "<Your-Bucket>"} } );
var fs = require('fs');
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
   let parsedData = JSON.parse(event)
   let encodedImage = parsedData.Image;
   var filePath = parsedData.name;
   let buf = new Buffer(encodedImage.replace(/^data:image\/\w+;base64,/, ""),'base64')
   var data = {
       Key: filePath,
       Body: buf,
       ContentEncoding: 'base64',
       ContentType: 'image/jpeg'
   };
   s3Bucket.putObject(data, function(err, data){
       if (err) {
           console.log('Error uploading data: ', data);
           callback(err, null);
       } else {
           var params = {
             Image: {
              S3Object: {
               Bucket: "<Your-Bucket>",
               Name: filePath
              }
             },
             MaxLabels: 10,
             MinConfidence: 90
            };
           rekognition.detectLabels(params, function(err, data) {
               if (err){
                   console.log(err, err.stack);
                   callback(err)
               }
               else{
                   console.log(data);
                   callback(null, data);
               }
           });
       }
   });
};

In the above code, we would receive the image from React Native which we are storing in S3 Bucket. The stored image is sent to Amazon Recognition which has detectLabels method that detects the labels from the image and sends the response with the detected labels in JSON format.

capture image screen

Once you capture an image you can see a preview of that image as shown below.

Nike backpack

On submitting the captured image you can see the label of that image as shown below:

Object recognised as backpack

That’s all folks! I hope it was helpful.
For any queries drop them in the comments section.

This story is authored by Dheeraj Kumar and Venu Vaka. Dheeraj is a software engineer specializing in React Native and React based frontend development. Venu is a software engineer specializing in ReactJS and AWS Cloud.

AWS QuickSight Auto-Narratives to Highlight Insights using Natural Language Processing

Most often analyzing data sets to summarize their main characteristics, is done with visuals. Yet still one has to sift through the visuals, drilling down, comparing values, and rechecking ideas to extract a conclusion. But with QuickSight that is not the case, using its auto-narratives feature, one could extrapolate conclusion from the data analysis or highlight insights and state them plainly in a natural language as part of the analysis or report. However in day to day analysis, a balanced mix of plain statements and visuals is appreciated. One could use this feature to add a brief summary of the analysis or highlight important points.

In this blog post, I will be using Discovering Barcelona dashboard, created earlier for my previous articles Visualizing Multiple Datasets in AWS QuickSight and Adding User-Interactivity to AWS QuickSight Dashboards. We will look at how to add insights to QuickSight Dashboards, and use auto-narratives to give a brief about Accidents in Barcelona.

Let us have a look at what we are gonna build.

In the below picture, the green highlighted section is the Insights auto generated from the dataset by QuickSight. If you like these insights and want them as part of analysis, you could add them. This is shown in the red highlight.

Once an Insight is added to an analysis the content it holds is called a Narrative.

Adding a Custom Insight:

Let’s learn more about computations later, for now closing this Computation modal will add an empty insight to our analysis.

I also deleted the previous insight, so I could start from scratch with this new one. To customize the insight either click on Customize insight or from the drop down menu on the top right and choose Customize narrative. Make sure to add the fields required for the insight from the fields list. Select the insight visual and select the fields from Fields list. Once added you could see them in the Field wells bar highlighted in red at the top.

Computations are more like ready made templates, values coming from calculations done on the dataset, here’s a list of computations for you to explore. Parameters could also be used in the narrative logic. I have discussed what parameters are and how to use them here. Functions are the same as those we use to add calculated fields while editing data sets. Add computation.

The type of computation needed is chosen.

Once you apply the configuration, changes will be reflected in the analysis. Let us also add the Top ranked computations for month and district.

Once you add, they will be listed in the Computations section.

In the Computations section, the blue objects are variables that can be used in the narrative.

Now applying configurations would reflect in the analysis.

Similarly let’s add for the District also. First add the computation for the district and then configure the narrative.

Brief summary of the analysis using QuickSight Autonarratives

We successfully configured a custom narrative. 

One more cool thing about it is, filters linked with a control for a specific field can be added. I have a filter created earlier that applies to all visuals. Let us remove one district from using the control and see if it affects the Insight.

It affected, now you don’t see the Example district from both Visual, Insight, and also the stats have also changed!

That’s broadly about AWS QuickSight auto-narratives, I hope this was helpful. Please experiment, and do let me know if I missed something in the comment section.

This story is authored by Koushik. He is a software engineer and a keen data science and machine learning enthusiast.

AWS Machine Learning Data Engineering Pipeline for Batch Data

This post walks you through all the steps required to build a data engineering pipeline for batch data using AWS Step Functions. The sequence of steps works like so : the ingested data arrives as a CSV file in a S3 based data lake in the landing zone, which automatically triggers a Lambda function to invoke the Step Function. I have assumed that data is being ingested daily in a .csv file with a filename_date.csv naming convention like so customers_20190821.csv. The step function, as the first step, starts a landing to raw zone file transfer operation via a Lambda Function. Then we have an AWS Glue crawler crawl the raw data into an Athena table, which is used as a source for AWS Glue based PySpark transformation script. The transformed data is written in the refined zone in the parquet format. Again an AWS Glue crawler runs to “reflect” this refined data into another Athena table. Finally, the data science team can consume this refined data available in the Athena table, using an AWS Sagemaker based Jupyter notebook instance. It is to be noted that the data science does not need to do any data pull manually, as the data engineering pipeline automatically pulls in the delta data, as per the data refresh schedule that writes new data in the landing zone.

Let’s go through the steps

How to make daily data available to Amazon SageMaker?

What is Amazon SageMaker?

Amazon SageMaker is an end-to-end machine learning (ML) platform that can be leveraged to build, train, and deploy machine learning models in AWS. Using the Amazon SageMaker Notebook module, improves the efficiency of interacting with the data without the latency of bringing it locally.
For deep dive into Amazon SageMaker, please go through the official docs.

In this blog post, I will be using a dummy customers data. The customers data consists of retailer information and units purchased.

Updating Table Definitions with AWS Glue

The data catalog feature of AWS Glue and the inbuilt integration to Amazon S3 simplifies the process of identifying data and deriving the schema definition out of the source data. Glue crawlers within Data catalog, are used to build out the metadata tables of data stored in Amazon S3.

I created a crawler named raw for the data in raw zone (s3://bucketname/data/raw/customers/). In case you are just starting out on AWS Glue crawler, I have explained how to create one from scratch in one of my earlier article. If you run this crawler, it creates customers table in specified database (raw).

Create an invocation Lambda Function

In case you are just starting out on Lambda functions, I have explained how to create one from scratch with an IAM role to access the StepFunctions, Amazon S3, Lambda and CloudWatch in my earlier article.

Add trigger to the created Lambda function named invoke-step-functions. Configure Bucket, Prefix and  Suffix accordingly.

Once file is arrived at landing zone, it triggers the invoke Lambda function which extracts year, month, day from file name that comes from event. It passes year, month, day with two characters from uuid as input to the AWS StepFunctions.Please replace the following code in invoke-step-function Lambda.

import json
import uuid
import boto3
from datetime import datetime

sfn_client = boto3.client('stepfunctions')

stm_arn = 'arn:aws:states:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:stateMachine:Datapipeline-for-SageMaker'

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    
    # Extract bucket name and file path from event
    bucket_name = event['Records'][0]['s3']['bucket']['name']
    path = event['Records'][0]['s3']['object']['key']
    
    file_name_date = path.split('/')[2]
    processing_date_str = file_name_date.split('_')[1].replace('.csv', '')
    processing_date = datetime.strptime(processing_date_str, '%Y%m%d')
    
    # Extract year, month, day from date
    year = processing_date.strftime('%Y')
    month = processing_date.strftime('%m')
    day = processing_date.strftime('%d')
    
    uuid_temp = uuid.uuid4().hex[:2]
    execution_name = '{processing_date_str}-{uuid_temp}'.format(processing_date_str=processing_date_str, uuid_temp=uuid_temp)
    
    # Starts the execution of AWS StepFunctions
    response = sfn_client.start_execution(
          stateMachineArn = stm_arn,
          name= str(execution_name),
          input= json.dumps({"year": year, "month": month, "day": day})
      )
    
    return {"year": year, "month": month, "day": day}

Create a Generic FileTransfer Lambda

Create a Lambda function named generic-file-transfer as we created earlier in this article. In the file transfer Lambda function, it transfers files from landing zone to raw zone and landing zone to archive zone based on event coming from the StepFunction.

  1. If step is landing-to-raw-file-transfer, the Lambda function copies files from landing to raw zone.
  2. If step is landing-to-archive-file-transfer, the Lambda function copies files from landing to archive zone and deletes files from landing zone.

Please replace the following code in generic-file-transfer Lambda.

import json
import boto3

s3 = boto3.resource('s3')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    
    # Extract Parameters from Event (invoked by StepFunctions)
    step = event['step']
    year = event['year']
    month = event['month']
    day = event['day']
    
    bucket_name = event['bucket_name']
    source_prefix = event['source_prefix']
    destination_prefix = event['destination_prefix']
    
    bucket = s3.Bucket(bucket_name)
    
    for objects in bucket.objects.filter(Prefix = source_prefix):
        file_path = objects.key
        
        if ('.csv' in file_path) and (step == 'landing-to-raw-file-transfer'):
            
            # Extract filename from file_path
            file_name_date = file_path.split('/')[2]
            file_name = file_name_date.split('_')[0]
            
            # Add filename to the destination prefix
            destination_prefix = '{destination_prefix}{file_name}/year={year}/month={month}/day={day}/'.format(destination_prefix=destination_prefix, file_name=file_name, year=year, month=month, day=day)
            print(destination_prefix)
            
            source_object = {'Bucket': bucket_name, "Key": file_path}
            
            # Replace source prefix with destination prefix
            new_path = file_path.replace(source_prefix, destination_prefix)
            
            # Copies file
            new_object = bucket.Object(new_path)
            new_object.copy(source_object)
         
        if ('.csv' in file_path) and (step == 'landing-to-archive-file-transfer'):
            
            # Add filename to the destination prefix
            destination_prefix = '{destination_prefix}{year}-{month}-{day}/'.format(destination_prefix=destination_prefix, year=year, month=month, day=day)
            print(destination_prefix)
            
            source_object = {'Bucket': bucket_name, "Key": file_path}
            
            # Replace source prefix with destination prefix
            new_path = file_path.replace(source_prefix, destination_prefix)
            
            # Copies file
            new_object = bucket.Object(new_path)
            new_object.copy(source_object)
            
            # Deletes copied file
            bucket.objects.filter(Prefix = file_path).delete()
            
    return {"year": year, "month": month, "day": day}

Generic FileTransfer Lambda function setup is now complete. We need to check all files are copied successfully from one zone to another zone. If you have large files that needs to be copied, you could check out our Lightening fast distributed file transfer architecture.

Create Generic FileTransfer Status Check Lambda Function

Create a Lambda function named generic-file-transfer-status. If the step is landing to raw file transfer, the Lambda function checks if all files are copied from landing to raw zone by comparing the number of objects in landing and raw zones. If count doesn’t match it will raise an exception, and that exception is handled in AWS StepFunctions and retries after some backoff rate. If the count matches, all files are copied successfully. If the step is landing to archive file transfer, the Lambda function checks that any files are left in landing zone. Please replace the following code in generic-file-transfer-status Lambda function.

import json
import boto3

s3 = boto3.resource('s3')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    
    # Extract Parameters from Event (invoked by StepFunctions)
    step = event['step']
    year = event['year']
    month = event['month']
    day = event['day']
    
    bucket_name = event['bucket_name']
    source_prefix = event['source_prefix']
    destination_prefix = event['destination_prefix']
    
    bucket = s3.Bucket(bucket_name)
    
    class LandingToRawFileTransferIncompleteException(Exception):
        pass

    class LandingToArchiveFileTransferIncompleteException(Exception):
        pass
    
    if (step == 'landing-to-raw-file-transfer'):
        if file_transfer_status(bucket, source_prefix, destination_prefix):
            print('File Transfer from Landing to Raw Completed Successfully')
        else:
            raise LandingToRawFileTransferIncompleteException('File Transfer from Landing to Raw not completed')
    
    if (step == 'landing-to-archive-file-transfer'):
        if is_empty(bucket, source_prefix):
            print('File Transfer from Landing to Archive Completed Successfully')
        else:
            raise LandingToArchiveFileTransferIncompleteException('File Transfer from Landing to Archive not completed.')
    
    return {"year": year, "month": month, "day": day}

def file_transfer_status(bucket, source_prefix, destination_prefix):
    
    try:
        
        # Checks number of objects at the source prefix (count of objects at source i.e., landing zone)
        source_object_count = 0
        for obj in bucket.objects.filter(Prefix = source_prefix):
            path = obj.key
            if (".csv" in path):
                source_object_count = source_object_count + 1
        print(source_object_count)
        
        # Checks number of objects at the destination prefix (count of objects at destination i.e., raw zone)
        destination_object_count = 0
        for obj in bucket.objects.filter(Prefix = destination_prefix):
            path = obj.key
            
            if (".csv" in path):
                destination_object_count = destination_object_count + 1
        
        print(destination_object_count)
        return (source_object_count == destination_object_count)

    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        raise e

def is_empty(bucket, prefix):
    
    try:
        # Checks if any files left in the prefix (i.e., files in landing zone)
        object_count = 0
        for obj in bucket.objects.filter(Prefix = prefix):
            path = obj.key

            if ('.csv' in path):
                object_count = object_count + 1
                    
        print(object_count)
        return (object_count == 0)
        
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
        raise e

Create a Generic Crawler invocation Lamda

Create a Lambda function named generic-crawler-invoke. The Lambda function invokes a crawler. The crawler name is passed as argument from AWS StepFunctions through event object. Please replace the following code in generic-crawler-invoke Lambda function.

import json
import boto3

glue_client = boto3.client('glue')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    
    # Extract Parameters from Event (invoked by StepFunctions)
    year = event['year']
    month = event['month']
    day = event['day']
    
    crawler_name = event['crawler_name']
    
    try:
        response = glue_client.start_crawler(Name = crawler_name)
    except Exception as e:
        print('Crawler in progress', e)
        raise e
    
    return {"year": year, "month": month, "day": day}

Create a Generic Crawler Status Lambda

Create a Lambda function named generic-crawler-status. The Lambda function checks whether the crawler ran successfully or not. If crawler is in running state, the Lambda function raises an exception and the exception will be handled in the Step Function and retries after a certain backoff rate. Please replace the following code in generic-crawler-status Lambda.

import json
import boto3

glue_client = boto3.client('glue')

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    
    class CrawlerInProgressException(Exception):
        pass
    
    # Extract Parametres from Event (invoked by StepFunctions)
    year = event['year']
    month = event['month']
    day = event['day']
    
    crawler_name = event['crawler_name']
    
    response = glue_client.get_crawler_metrics(CrawlerNameList =[crawler_name])
    print(response['CrawlerMetricsList'][0]['CrawlerName']) 
    print(response['CrawlerMetricsList'][0]['TimeLeftSeconds']) 
    print(response['CrawlerMetricsList'][0]['StillEstimating']) 
    
    if (response['CrawlerMetricsList'][0]['StillEstimating']):
        raise CrawlerInProgressException('Crawler In Progress!')
    elif (response['CrawlerMetricsList'][0]['TimeLeftSeconds'] > 0):
        raise CrawlerInProgressException('Crawler In Progress!')
    
    return {"year": year, "month": month, "day": day}

Create an AWS Glue Job

AWS Glue is a fully managed ETL (extract, transform, and load) service that makes it simple and cost-effective to categorize your data, clean it, enrich it, and move it reliably between various data stores. For deep dive into AWS Glue, please go through the official docs.

Create an AWS Glue Job named raw-refined. In case you are just starting out on AWS Glue Jobs, I have explained how to create one from scratch in my earlier article. This Glue job converts file format from csv to parquet and stores in refined zone. The push down predicate is used as filter condition for reading data of only the processing date using the partitions.

import sys
from awsglue.transforms import *
from awsglue.utils import getResolvedOptions
from pyspark.context import SparkContext
from awsglue.context import GlueContext
from awsglue.job import Job

## @params: [JOB_NAME]
# args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME'])

args = getResolvedOptions(sys.argv, ['JOB_NAME', 'year', 'month', 'day'])

year = args['year']
month = args['month']
day = args['day']

sc = SparkContext()
glueContext = GlueContext(sc)
spark = glueContext.spark_session
job = Job(glueContext)
job.init(args['JOB_NAME'], args)

datasource0 = glueContext.create_dynamic_frame.from_catalog(database = "raw", table_name = "customers", push_down_predicate ="((year == " + year + ") and (month == " + month + ") and (day == " + day + "))", transformation_ctx = "datasource0")

applymapping1 = ApplyMapping.apply(frame = datasource0, mappings = [("email_id", "string", "email_id", "string"), ("retailer_name", "string", "retailer_name", "string"), ("units_purchased", "long", "units_purchased", "long"), ("purchase_date", "string", "purchase_date", "string"), ("sale_id", "string", "sale_id", "string"), ("year", "string", "year", "string"), ("month", "string", "month", "string"), ("day", "string", "day", "string")], transformation_ctx = "applymapping1")

resolvechoice2 = ResolveChoice.apply(frame = applymapping1, choice = "make_struct", transformation_ctx = "resolvechoice2")

dropnullfields3 = DropNullFields.apply(frame = resolvechoice2, transformation_ctx = "dropnullfields3")

datasink4 = glueContext.write_dynamic_frame.from_options(frame = dropnullfields3, connection_type = "s3", connection_options = {"path": "s3://bucketname/data/refined/customers/", "partitionKeys": ["year","month","day"]}, format = "parquet", transformation_ctx = "datasink4")

job.commit()

Create a Refined Crawler as we created Raw Crawler earlier in this article. Please point the crawler path to refined zone(s3://bucketname/data/refined/customers/) and database as refined. No need to create a Lambda function for refined crawler invocation and status, as we will pass crawler names from the StepFunction.

Resources required to create an the StepFunction have been created.

Creating the AWS StepFunction

StepFunction is where we create and orchestrate steps to process data according to our workflow. Create an AWS StepFunctions named Datapipeline-for-SageMaker.  In case you are just starting out on AWS StepFunctions, I have explained how to create one from scratch here.

Data is being ingested into landing zone. It triggers a Lambda function which in turn invokes the execution of the StepFunction. The steps in the StepFunction are as follows:

  1. Transfers files from landing zone to raw zone.
  2. Checks all files are copied to raw zone successfully or not.
  3. Invokes raw Crawler which crawls data in raw zone and updates/creates definition of table in the specified database.
  4. Checks if the Crawler is completed successfully or not.
  5. Invokes Glue Job and waits for it to complete.
  6. Invokes refined Crawler which crawls data from refined zone in and updates/creates definition of table in the specified database.
  7. Checks if the Crawler is completed successfully or not.
  8. Transfers files from landing zone to archive zone and deletes files from landing zone.
  9. Checks all files are copied and deleted from landing zone successfully.

Please update the StepFunctions definition with the following code.

{
  "Comment": "Datapipeline For MachineLearning in AWS Sagemaker",
  "StartAt": "LandingToRawFileTransfer",
  "States": {
    "LandingToRawFileTransfer": {
      "Comment": "Transfers files from landing zone to Raw zone.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "step": "landing-to-raw-file-transfer",
        "bucket_name": "bucketname",
        "source_prefix": "data/landing/",
        "destination_prefix": "data/raw/",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-file-transfer",
      "TimeoutSeconds": 4500,
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferPassed"
    },
    "LandingToRawFileTransferFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Landing To Raw File Transfer failed"
    },
    "LandingToRawFileTransferPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferStatus"
    },
    "LandingToRawFileTransferStatus": {
      "Comment": "Checks whether all files are copied from landing to raw zone successfully.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "step": "landing-to-raw-file-transfer",
        "bucket_name": "bucketname",
        "source_prefix": "data/landing/",
        "destination_prefix": "data/raw/",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-file-transfer-status",
      "Retry": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "LandingToRawFileTransferInCompleteException"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.All"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        }
      ],
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferStatusFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferStatusFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "LandingToRawFileTransferStatusPassed"
    },
    "LandingToRawFileTransferStatusFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Landing To Raw File Transfer failed"
    },
    "LandingToRawFileTransferStatusPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "StartRawCrawler"
    },
    "StartRawCrawler": {
      "Comment": "Crawls data from raw zone and adds table definition to the specified Database. IF table definition exists updates the definition.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "crawler_name": "raw",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-crawler-invoke",
      "TimeoutSeconds": 4500,
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "StartRawCrawlerFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "StartRawCrawlerFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "StartRawCrawlerPassed"
    },
    "StartRawCrawlerFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "StartRawCrawlerPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "RawCrawlerStatus"
    },
    "RawCrawlerStatus": {
      "Comment": "Checks whether crawler is successfully completed.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "crawler_name": "raw",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-crawler-status",
      "Retry": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "CrawlerInProgressException"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.All"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        }
      ],
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "RawCrawlerStatusFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "RawCrawlerStatusFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "RawCrawlerStatusPassed"
    },
    "RawCrawlerStatusFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "RawCrawlerStatusPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "GlueJob"
    },
    "GlueJob": {
      "Comment": "Invokes Glue job and waits for Glue job to complete.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:states:::glue:startJobRun.sync",
      "Parameters": {
        "JobName": "retail-raw-refined",
        "Arguments": {
          "--refined_prefix": "data/refined",
          "--year.$": "$.year",
          "--month.$": "$.month",
          "--day.$": "$.day"
        }
      },
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "GlueJobFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "GlueJobFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "GlueJobPassed"
    },
    "GlueJobFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "GlueJobPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.Arguments.--year",
        "month.$": "$.Arguments.--month",
        "day.$": "$.Arguments.--day"
      },
      "Next": "StartRefinedCrawler"
    },
    "StartRefinedCrawler": {
      "Comment": "Crawls data from refined zone and adds table definition to the specified Database.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "crawler_name": "refined",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-crawler-invoke",
      "TimeoutSeconds": 4500,
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "StartRefinedCrawlerFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "StartRefinedCrawlerFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "StartRefinedCrawlerPassed"
    },
    "StartRefinedCrawlerFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "StartRefinedCrawlerPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "RefinedCrawlerStatus"
    },
    "RefinedCrawlerStatus": {
      "Comment": "Checks whether crawler is successfully completed.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "crawler_name": "refined",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-crawler-status",
      "Retry": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "CrawlerInProgressException"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.All"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        }
      ],
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "RefinedCrawlerStatusFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "RefinedCrawlerStatusFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "RefinedCrawlerStatusPassed"
    },
    "RefinedCrawlerStatusFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "RefinedCrawlerStatusPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransfer"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransfer": {
      "Comment": "Transfers files from landing zone to archived zone",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "step": "landing-to-archive-file-transfer",
        "bucket_name": "bucketname",
        "source_prefix": "data/landing/",
        "destination_prefix": "data/raw/",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-file-transfer",
      "TimeoutSeconds": 4500,
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferPassed"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransferFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "Crawler invocation failed"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransferPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatus"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatus": {
      "Comment": "Checks whether all files are copied from landing to archived successfully.",
      "Type": "Task",
      "Parameters": {
        "step": "landing-to-archive-file-transfer",
        "bucket_name": "bucketname",
        "source_prefix": "data/landing/",
        "destination_prefix": "data/raw/",
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:us-west-2:XXXXXXXXXXXX:function:generic-file-transfer-status",
      "Retry": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "LandingToArchiveFileTransferInCompleteException"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.All"
          ],
          "IntervalSeconds": 30,
          "BackoffRate": 2,
          "MaxAttempts": 5
        }
      ],
      "Catch": [
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.TaskFailed"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatusFailed"
        },
        {
          "ErrorEquals": [
            "States.ALL"
          ],
          "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatusFailed"
        }
      ],
      "Next": "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatusPassed"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatusFailed": {
      "Type": "Fail",
      "Cause": "LandingToArchiveFileTransfer invocation failed"
    },
    "LandingToArchiveFileTransferStatusPassed": {
      "Type": "Pass",
      "ResultPath": "$",
      "Parameters": {
        "year.$": "$.year",
        "month.$": "$.month",
        "day.$": "$.day"
      },
      "End": true
    }
  }
}

After updating the AWS StepFunctions definition, the visual workflow looks like the following.

Now upload file in data/landing/ zone in the bucket  where the trigger has been configured with the Lambda. The execution of StepFunction has started and the visual workflow looks like the following.

In RawCrawlerStatus step, if the Lambda is failing we retry till sometime and then mark the StepFunction as failed. If the StepFunction ran successfully. The visual workflow of the StepFunction looks like following.

Machine Learning workflow using Amazon SageMaker

The final step in this data pipeline is to make the processed data available in a Jupyter notebook instance of the Amazon SageMaker. Jupyter notebooks are popularly used among data scientists to do exploratory data analysis, build and train machine learning models.

Create Notebook Instance in Amazon SageMaker

Step1: In the Amazon SageMaker console choose Create notebook instance.

Step2: In the Notebook Instance settings populate the Notebook instance name, choose an instance type depends on data size, and a role for the notebook instances in Amazon SageMaker to interact with Amazon S3. The SageMaker execution role needs to have the required permission to Athena, the S3 buckets where the data resides, and KMS if encrypted.

Step3: Wait for the Notebook instances to be created and the Status to change to InService.

Step4: Choose the Open Jupyter, which will open the notebook interface in a new browser tab.

Click new to create a new notebook in Jupyter. Amazon SageMaker provides several kernels for Jupyter including support for Python 2 and 3, MXNet, TensorFlow, and PySpark. Choose Python as the kernel for this exercise as it comes with the Pandas library built in.

Step5: Within the notebook, execute the following commands to install the Athena JDBC driver. PyAthena is a Python DB API 2.0 (PEP 249) compliant client for the Amazon Athena JDBC driver.

import sys
!{sys.executable} -m pip install PyAthena

Step6: After the Athena driver is installed, you can use the JDBC connection to connect to Athena and populate the Pandas data frames. For data scientists, working with data is typically divided into multiple stages: munging and cleaning data, analyzing/ modeling it, then organizing the results of the analysis into a form suitable for plotting or tabular display. Pandas is the ideal tool for all of these tasks.

from pyathena import connect
import pandas as pd
conn = connect(s3_staging_dir='<ATHENA QUERY RESULTS LOCATION>',
               region_name='REGION, for example, us-east-1')

df = pd.read_sql("SELECT * FROM <DATABASE>.<TABLENAME> limit 10;", conn)
df

As shown above, the dataframe always stays consistent with the latest incoming data because of the data engineering pipeline setup earlier in the ML workflow. This dataframe can be used for downstream ad-hoc model building purposes or for exploratory data analysis.

That’s it folks. Thanks for the read.

This story is authored by PV Subbareddy. Subbareddy is a Big Data Engineer specializing on Cloud Big Data Services and Apache Spark Ecosystem.

Real Time Face Identification on Live Camera Feed using Amazon Rekognition Video and Kinesis Video Streams

In this post, we are going to learn how to perform facial analysis on live feed by setting up a serverless video analytics architecture using Amazon Rekognition Video and Amazon Kinesis Video Streams.

Use cases:

  1. Intruder notification system
  2. Employee sign-in system

Architecture overview

Real time face recognition using AWS on a live video stream

We shall learn how to use the webcam of a laptop (we can, of course, use professional grade cameras and hook it up with Kinesis Video streams for a production ready system) to send a live video feed to the  Amazon Kinesis Video Stream. The stream processor in Amazon Rekognition Video picks up this webcam feed and analyses by comparing this feed with the faces in the face collection created beforehand. This analysis is written to the Amazon Kinesis Data Stream. For each record written to the Kinesis data stream, the lambda function is invoked. This lambda reads the record from kinesis stream data. If there are any facial matches or mismatches, depending upon how the lambda is configured an email notification is sent via Amazon SNS (Simple Notification Service) to the registered email addresses.

Note: Make sure all the above AWS resources are created in the same region.

Before going further, make sure you already have the AWS CLI configured on your machine. If not, follow this link –  https://docs.aws.amazon.com/cli/latest/userguide/cli-chap-getting-started.html

Step-1: Create Kinesis Video Stream

We need to create the Kinesis Video Stream for our webcam to connect and send the feed to Kinesis Video Streams from AWS console. Create a new one by clicking the Create button. Give the stream a name in stream configuration.

We have successfully created a Kinesis video stream.

Step-2: Send Live Feed to the Kinesis Video Stream

We need a video producer, anything that sends media data to the Kinesis video stream is called a producer. AWS currently provides producer library primarily supported in these four languages(JAVA, Android, C++, C) only. We use the C++ Producer Library as a GStreamer plugin.

To easily send media from a variety of devices on a variety of operating systems, this tutorial uses GStreamer, an open-source media framework that standardizes access to cameras and other media sources.

Download the Amazon Kinesis Video Streams Producer SDK from Github using the following Git command:

git clone https://github.com/awslabs/amazon-kinesis-video-streams-producer-sdk-cpp 

After downloading successfully you can compile and install the GStreamer sample in the kinesis-video-native-build directory using the following commands:

For Ubuntu – run the following commands

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install libgstreamer1.0-dev libgstreamer-plugins-base1.0-dev gstreamer1.0-plugins-base-apps

sudo apt-get install gstreamer1.0-plugins-bad gstreamer1.0-plugins-good gstreamer1.0-plugins-ugly gstreamer1.0-tools

For Windows – run the following commands

Inside mingw32 or mingw64 shell, go to kinesis-video-native-build directory and run ./min-install-script 

For macOS – run the following commands

Install homebrew

Run brew install pkg-config openssl cmake gstreamer gst-plugins-base gst-plugins-good gst-plugins-bad gst-plugins-ugly log4cplus

Go to kinesis-video-native-build directory and run ./min-install-script

Running the GStreamer webcam sample application:
The sample application kinesis_video_gstreamer_sample_app in the kinesis-video-native-build directory uses GStreamer pipeline to get video data from the camera. Launch it with the kinesis video stream name created in Step-1 and it will start streaming from the camera.

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=<YourAccessKeyId> AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=<YourSecretAccessKey> ./kinesis_video_gstreamer_sample_app <stream_name>

After running the above command, the streaming would start and you can see the live feed in Media preview of Kinesis Video Stream created in the Step-1.

Step-3: Creating Resources using AWS CloudFormation Stack

The CloudFormation stack will create the resources that are highlighted in the following image.

Highlighted resources to be created using CloudFormation
  1. The following link will automatically open a new CloudFormation Stack in us-west-2: CloudFormation Stack.
  2. Go to View in Designer and edit the template code and click on create stack.
    1. Change the name of the application from Default.
    2. Change the Nodejs version of the RekognitionVideoLambda to 10.x (Version 6.10 isn’t supported anymore) and then click on create stack.
editing CloudFormation stack template

Enter your Email Address to receive notifications and then choose Next as shown below:

Skip the Configure stack options step by choosing Next. In the final step you must check the checkbox and then choose Create stack as in the below image:

Once the stack created successfully you can see it in your stacks as below with status CREATE_COMPLETE. This creates the required resources.

Once completed, you will receive a confirmation email to subscribe/receive notifications. Make sure you subscribed to that.

snapshot from subscribe confirmation email

Step-4: Add face to a Collection

As learned earlier the Stream Processor in Amazon Rekognition Video picks up and analyzes the feed coming from Kinesis Video Stream by comparing it with the faces in the face collection. Let’s create this collection.

For more information follow the link – https://docs.aws.amazon.com/rekognition/latest/dg/create-collection-procedure.html

Create Collection: Create a face collection using the AWS CLI on the command line with below command:

aws rekognition create-collection --collection-id <Collection_Name> --region us-west-2

Add face(s) to the collection: You can use your picture for testing.
First we need to upload the image(s) to an Amazon S3 bucket in the us-west-2 region. Run the below command by replacing BUCKET_NAME, FILE_NAME with your details and you can give any name for FACE-TAG ( can be name of the person).

aws rekognition index-faces --image '{"S3Object":{"Bucket":"<BUCKET_NAME>","Name":"<FILE_NAME>.jpeg"}}' --collection-id "rekVideoBlog" --detection-attributes "ALL" --external-image-id "<FACE-TAG>" --region us-west-2

After that you will receive a response as output as shown below

Now we all ready to go further. If you have multiple photos run the above command again with the new file name.

Step-5: Creating the Stream Processor

We need to create a stream processor which does all the work of reading video stream, facial analysis against face collection and finally writing the analysis data to Kinesis data stream. It contains information about the Kinesis data stream, Kinesis video stream, Face collection ID and the role that is used by Rekognition to access Kinesis Video Stream.

Copy meta info required:
Go to your Kinesis video stream created in step-1, note down the Stream ARN (KINESIS_VIDEO_STREAM_ARN) from the stream info as shown below:

Next from the CloudFormation stack output note down the values of KinesisDataStreamArn (KINESIS_DATA_STREAM_ARN) and RecognitionVideoIAM (IAM_ROLE_ARN) as shown below:

Now create a JSON file in your system that contains the following information:

{
       "Name": "streamProcessorForRekognitionVideoBlog",
       "Input": {
              "KinesisVideoStream": {
                     "Arn": "<KINESIS_VIDEO_STREAM_ARN>"
              }
       },
       "Output": {
              "KinesisDataStream": {
                     "Arn": "<KINESIS_DATA_STREAM_ARN>"
              }
       },
       "RoleArn": "<IAM_ROLE_ARN>",
       "Settings": {
              "FaceSearch": {
                     "CollectionId": "COLLECTION_NAME",
                     "FaceMatchThreshold": 85.5
              }
       }
}

Create the stream processor with AWS CLI from command line with following command:

aws rekognition create-stream-processor --region us-west-2 --cli-input-json file://<PATH_TO_JSON_FILE_ABOVE>

Now start the stream processor with following command:

aws rekognition start-stream-processor --name streamProcessorForRekognitionVideoBlog --region us-west-2

You can see if the stream processor is in a running state with following command:

aws rekognition list-stream-processors --region us-west-2

If it’s running, you will see below response:

And also make sure your camera is streaming in command line and feed is being received by the Kinesis video stream.

Now you would get notified whenever known or an unknown person shows up in your webcam.

Example notification:

Note: 

  1. Lambda can be configured to send email notification only if unknown faces are detected or vice versa.
  2. For cost optimization, one could use a python script to call Amazon Rekognition service with a snapshot only when a person is detected instead of wasting resources in uninhabited/unpeopled area.

Step-6: Cleaning Up Once Done

Stop the stream processor.

aws rekognition stop-stream-processor --name streamProcessorForRekognitionVideoBlog --region us-west-2

Delete the stream processor.

aws rekognition delete-stream-processor --name streamProcessorForRekognitionVideoBlog --region us-west-2

Delete the Kinesis Video Stream. Go to the Kinesis video streams from AWS console and select your stream and Delete.

Delete the CloudFormation stack. Go to the CloudFormation, then select stacks from AWS console and select your stack and Delete.

Thanks for the read! I hope it was both fun and useful.

This story is co-authored by Venu and Koushik. Venu is a software engineer and machine learning enthusiast. Koushik is a software engineer and a keen data science and machine learning enthusiast.

Machine Learning Operations (MLOps) Pipeline using Google Cloud Composer

In an earlier post, we had described the need for automating the Data Engineering pipeline for Machine Learning based systems. Today, we will expand the scope to setup a fully automated MLOps pipeline using Google Cloud Composer.

Cloud Composer

Cloud Composer is official defined as a fully managed workflow orchestration service that empowers you to author, schedule, and monitor pipelines that span across clouds and on-premises data centers. Built on the popular Apache Airflow open source project and operated using the Python programming language, Cloud Composer is free from lock-in and easy to use.

So let’s get on with the required steps to create this MLOps infrastructure on Google Cloud Platform

Creating a Cloud Composer Environment

Step1: Please enable the Cloud Composer API.

Step2: Go to create environment page in GCP console. Composer is available in Big Data section.

Step3: Click on create to start creating a Composer environment

Step4: Please select the Service account which has the required permissions to access GCS, Big Query, ML Engine and  Composer environment. The required roles for accessing Composer environment is Composer Administrator and Composer Worker. 
For more details about access control in Composer environment please see this.

Step5: Please use Python Version 3 and latest Image version.

Step6: Click on create. It will take about 15-20 minutes to create the environment. Once it completes, the environment page shall look like the following.

Click on Airflow to see Airflow WebUI. The Airflow WebUI looks as follows

DAGs folder is where our dag file is stored. DAG folder is nothing but a folder inside a GCS bucket which is created by the environment. To know more about the concept of DAG and general introduction to Airflow, please refer to this post.

You could see Composer related logs in Logging.

Step7: Please add the following PyPI packages in Composer environment.

Click on created environment and navigate to PYPI packages and click on edit to add packages

The required packages are:

# to read data from MongoDB
pymongo==3.8.0
oauth2client==4.1.3
# to read data from firestore
google-cloud-firestore==1.3.0
firebase-admin==2.17.0
google-api-core==1.13.0

Create a ML model

Step1: Please create a folder structure like the following on your instance.

ml_model
├── setup.py
└── trainer
    ├── __init__.py
    └── train.py

Step2: Please place the following code in train.py file, which shall upload the model to GCS bucket as shown below. This model would be used to create model versions as explained a bit later.

from google.cloud import bigquery
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression
import numpy as np
from google.cloud import storage
import datetime
import json
import pickle
client = bigquery.Client()
sql = '''
SELECT *
FROM `<PROJECT_ID>.<DATASET>.<TABLENAME>`
'''

df = client.query(sql).to_dataframe()
df = df[['is_stressed', 'is_engaged', 'status']]

df['is_stressed'] = df['is_stressed'].fillna('n')
df['is_engaged'] = df['is_engaged'].fillna('n')
df['stressed'] = np.where(df['is_stressed']=='y', 1, 0)
df['engaged'] = np.where(df['is_engaged']=='y', 1, 0)
df['status'] = np.where(df['status']=='complete', 1, 0)

feature_cols = ['stressed', 'engaged']
X = df[feature_cols]
y = df.status
X_train,X_test,y_train,y_test=train_test_split(X,y,test_size=0.25,random_state=0)
logreg = LogisticRegression()
logreg.fit(X_train,y_train)
pkl_filename = "model.pkl"  
with open(pkl_filename, 'wb') as file:  
    pickle.dump(logreg, file)
BUCKET_NAME=BUCKET_NAME# Upload the model to GCS
bucket = storage.Client().bucket(BUCKET_NAME)
file_path = datetime.datetime.now().strftime('machine_learning/models/%Y%m%d_%H%M%S')
blob = bucket.blob('{}/{}'.format(
    file_path,
    pkl_filename))
blob.upload_from_filename(pkl_filename)

file_location = 'gs://{BUCKET_NAME}/{file_path}'.format(BUCKET_NAME=BUCKET_NAME, file_path=file_path)
file_config = json.dumps({'file_location': file_location})

bucket = storage.Client().bucket(COMPOSER_BUCKET)
blob = bucket.blob('data/file_config.json')
blob.upload_from_string(file_config)

Step3: Create an empty init.py file inside the trainer directory.

Step4: Please place the following code in setup.py file. The setup.py file contains required packages to execute code.

import setuptools

REQUIRED_PACKAGES = [
    'pandas-gbq==0.3.0',
    'cloudml-hypertune',
    'google-cloud-bigquery==1.14.0',
    'urllib3'
]

setuptools.setup(
    name='ml_model',
    version='1.0',
    install_requires=REQUIRED_PACKAGES,
    packages=setuptools.find_packages(),
    include_package_data=True,
    description='',
)

Step5: Packaging the code using the following command. It creates a gz file inside ml_model directory.

python3 setup.py sdist

Step6: The package name is the name that is specified in setup.py file. The package name becomes ml_model-1.0.tar.gz
Copy the package to gs://{your-GCS-bucket}/machine_learning/. This becomes the base directory for your machine learning activities described in this post.

Creating a DAG

In this use case, we have created a DAG file which exports some table data from a MongoDB instance into a GCS bucket and then creates a BigQuery table off of that exported data. It trains a model and creates version for that model. The DAG file supports full data extraction and daily data extraction explained in the code below using a variable tot_data. This variable is extracted from Airflow configurations set by the user. This process is also described later in this post.

Please place the following code in the DAG file.

import airflow
from airflow import DAG
from airflow.models import Variable
from airflow.operators.bash_operator import BashOperator
from datetime import timedelta, datetime
from airflow.operators.python_operator import PythonOperator
import pprint
import json
import re

from pymongo import MongoClient
from google.cloud import storage
from google.cloud.storage import blob
from google.cloud import storage
import os

from airflow import models
from mlengine_operator import MLEngineTrainingOperator, MLEngineVersionOperator

ts = datetime.now()
today = str(ts.date()) + 'T00:00:00.000Z'
yester_day = str(ts.date() - timedelta(days = 1)) + 'T00:00:00.000Z'

str_ts = ts.strftime('%Y_%m_%d_%H_%m_%S')

config = Variable.get("mongo_conf", deserialize_json=True)
host = config['host']
db_name = config['db_name']
table_name = config['table_name']
file_prefix = config['file_prefix']
bucket_name = config['bucket_name']
# file_path = file_prefix + '/' + table_name + '.json'
file_path = '{file_prefix}/{table_name}/{table_name}_{str_ts}.json'.format(file_prefix=file_prefix, str_ts=str_ts, table_name=table_name)
file_location = 'gs://' + bucket_name + '/' + file_prefix + '/' + table_name + '/' + table_name + '_*.json'
config['file_location'] = file_location
bq_dataset = config['bq_dataset']
tot_data = config['tot_data'].lower()

BUCKET_NAME = config['ml_configuration']['BUCKET_NAME']
BASE_DIR = config['ml_configuration']['BASE_DIR']
PACKAGE_NAME = config['ml_configuration']['PACKAGE_NAME']
TRAINER_BIN = os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'packages', PACKAGE_NAME)
TRAINER_MODULE = config['ml_configuration']['TRAINER_MODULE']
RUNTIME_VERSION = config['ml_configuration']['RUNTIME_VERSION']
PROJECT_ID = config['ml_configuration']['PROJECT_ID']
MODEL_NAME = config['ml_configuration']['MODEL_NAME']

MODEL_FILE_BUCKET = config['ml_configuration']['MODEL_FILE_BUCKET']
model_file_loc = config['ml_configuration']['MODEL_FILE_LOCATION']

bucket = storage.Client().bucket(MODEL_FILE_BUCKET)
blob = bucket.get_blob(model_file_loc)
file_config = json.loads(blob.download_as_string().decode("utf-8"))
export_uri = file_config['file_location']

def flatten_json(y):
    out = {}

    def flatten(x, name=''):
        if type(x) is dict:
            for a in x:
                flatten(x[a], name + a + '_')
        elif type(x) is list:
            i = 0
            for a in x:
                flatten(a, name + str(i) + '_')
                i += 1
        else:
            out[name[:-1]] = x

    flatten(y)
    return out

def mongoexport():
        client = storage.Client()
        bucket = client.get_bucket(bucket_name)
        blob = bucket.blob(file_path)

        client = MongoClient(host)
        db = client[db_name]
        tasks = db[table_name]
        pprint.pprint(tasks.count_documents({}))
        # if tot_data is set to 'yes' in airflow configurations, full data 
        # is processed.  
        if tot_data == 'no':
          query = {"edit_datetime": { "$gte": yester_day, "$lt": today}}
          print(query)
          data = tasks.find(query)
        else:
          data = tasks.find()
        emp_list = []
        for record in data:
                emp_list.append(json.dumps(record, default=str))
        flat_list =[]
        for data in emp_list:
                flat_list.append((flatten_json(json.loads(data))))
        data = '\n'.join(json.dumps({re.sub('[^0-9a-zA-Z_ ]+', '', str(k)).lower().replace(' ', '_'): str(v) for k, v in record.items()}) for record in flat_list)
        blob.upload_from_string(data)

default_args = {
    'start_date': airflow.utils.dates.days_ago(0),
    'retries': 1,
    'retry_delay': timedelta(minutes=5)
}

with DAG('ml_pipeline', schedule_interval=None, default_args=default_args) as dag:

    # priority_weight has type int in Airflow DB, uses the maximum.
    pymongo_export_op = PythonOperator(
        task_id='pymongo_export',
        python_callable=mongoexport,
        )

    update_bq_table_op = BashOperator(
        task_id='update_bq_table',
        bash_command='''
        bq rm -f {bq_dataset}.{table_name}
        bq load --autodetect --source_format=NEWLINE_DELIMITED_JSON --ignore_unknown_values=True {bq_dataset}.{table_name} {file_location}
        '''.format(bq_dataset=bq_dataset, table_name=table_name, file_location=file_location)
        )

    date_nospecial = '{{ execution_date.strftime("%Y%m%d") }}'
    date_min_nospecial = '{{ execution_date.strftime("%Y%m%d_%H%m") }}'
    uuid = '{{ macros.uuid.uuid4().hex[:8] }}'

    training_op = MLEngineTrainingOperator(
      task_id='submit_job_for_training',
      project_id=PROJECT_ID,
      job_id='{}_{}_{}'.format(table_name, date_nospecial, uuid),
      package_uris=[os.path.join(TRAINER_BIN)],
      training_python_module=TRAINER_MODULE,
      training_args=[
          '--base-dir={}'.format(BASE_DIR),
          '--event-date={}'.format(date_nospecial),
      ],
      region='us-central1',
      runtime_version=RUNTIME_VERSION,
      python_version='3.5')

    create_version_op = MLEngineVersionOperator(
      task_id='create_version',
      project_id=PROJECT_ID,
      model_name=MODEL_NAME,
      version={
          'name': 'version_{}_{}'.format(date_min_nospecial, uuid),
          'deploymentUri': export_uri,
          'runtimeVersion': RUNTIME_VERSION,
          'pythonVersion': '3.5',
          'framework': 'SCIKIT_LEARN',
      },
      operation='create')

    pymongo_export_op >> update_bq_table_op >> training_op >> create_version_op

Once file is created, please upload the file to DAGs folder. And also please add the following plugin dependency file named mlengine_operator in DAGs folder.
Place the following code in mlengine_operator.py file.

import re

from apiclient import errors

from airflow.contrib.hooks.gcp_mlengine_hook import MLEngineHook
from airflow.exceptions import AirflowException
from airflow.operators import BaseOperator
from airflow.utils.decorators import apply_defaults
from airflow.utils.log.logging_mixin import LoggingMixin

log = LoggingMixin().log


def _normalize_mlengine_job_id(job_id):

    # Add a prefix when a job_id starts with a digit or a template
    match = re.search(r'\d|\{{2}', job_id)
    if match and match.start() is 0:
        job = 'z_{}'.format(job_id)
    else:
        job = job_id

    # Clean up 'bad' characters except templates
    tracker = 0
    cleansed_job_id = ''
    for m in re.finditer(r'\{{2}.+?\}{2}', job):
        cleansed_job_id += re.sub(r'[^0-9a-zA-Z]+', '_',
                                  job[tracker:m.start()])
        cleansed_job_id += job[m.start():m.end()]
        tracker = m.end()

    # Clean up last substring or the full string if no templates
    cleansed_job_id += re.sub(r'[^0-9a-zA-Z]+', '_', job[tracker:])

    return cleansed_job_id


class MLEngineBatchPredictionOperator(BaseOperator):
   
    template_fields = [
        '_project_id',
        '_job_id',
        '_region',
        '_input_paths',
        '_output_path',
        '_model_name',
        '_version_name',
        '_uri',
    ]

    @apply_defaults
    def __init__(self,
                 project_id,
                 job_id,
                 region,
                 data_format,
                 input_paths,
                 output_path,
                 model_name=None,
                 version_name=None,
                 uri=None,
                 max_worker_count=None,
                 runtime_version=None,
                 gcp_conn_id='google_cloud_default',
                 delegate_to=None,
                 *args,
                 **kwargs):
        super(MLEngineBatchPredictionOperator, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

        self._project_id = project_id
        self._job_id = job_id
        self._region = region
        self._data_format = data_format
        self._input_paths = input_paths
        self._output_path = output_path
        self._model_name = model_name
        self._version_name = version_name
        self._uri = uri
        self._max_worker_count = max_worker_count
        self._runtime_version = runtime_version
        self._gcp_conn_id = gcp_conn_id
        self._delegate_to = delegate_to

        if not self._project_id:
            raise AirflowException('Google Cloud project id is required.')
        if not self._job_id:
            raise AirflowException(
                'An unique job id is required for Google MLEngine prediction '
                'job.')

        if self._uri:
            if self._model_name or self._version_name:
                raise AirflowException('Ambiguous model origin: Both uri and '
                                       'model/version name are provided.')

        if self._version_name and not self._model_name:
            raise AirflowException(
                'Missing model: Batch prediction expects '
                'a model name when a version name is provided.')

        if not (self._uri or self._model_name):
            raise AirflowException(
                'Missing model origin: Batch prediction expects a model, '
                'a model & version combination, or a URI to a savedModel.')

    def execute(self, context):
        job_id = _normalize_mlengine_job_id(self._job_id)
        prediction_request = {
            'jobId': job_id,
            'predictionInput': {
                'dataFormat': self._data_format,
                'inputPaths': self._input_paths,
                'outputPath': self._output_path,
                'region': self._region
            }
        }

        if self._uri:
            prediction_request['predictionInput']['uri'] = self._uri
        elif self._model_name:
            origin_name = 'projects/{}/models/{}'.format(
                self._project_id, self._model_name)
            if not self._version_name:
                prediction_request['predictionInput'][
                    'modelName'] = origin_name
            else:
                prediction_request['predictionInput']['versionName'] = \
                    origin_name + '/versions/{}'.format(self._version_name)

        if self._max_worker_count:
            prediction_request['predictionInput'][
                'maxWorkerCount'] = self._max_worker_count

        if self._runtime_version:
            prediction_request['predictionInput'][
                'runtimeVersion'] = self._runtime_version

        hook = MLEngineHook(self._gcp_conn_id, self._delegate_to)

        # Helper method to check if the existing job's prediction input is the
        # same as the request we get here.
        def check_existing_job(existing_job):
            return existing_job.get('predictionInput', None) == \
                prediction_request['predictionInput']

        try:
            finished_prediction_job = hook.create_job(
                self._project_id, prediction_request, check_existing_job)
        except errors.HttpError:
            raise

        if finished_prediction_job['state'] != 'SUCCEEDED':
            self.log.error('MLEngine batch prediction job failed: {}'.format(
                str(finished_prediction_job)))
            raise RuntimeError(finished_prediction_job['errorMessage'])

        return finished_prediction_job['predictionOutput']


class MLEngineModelOperator(BaseOperator):
    template_fields = [
        '_model',
    ]

    @apply_defaults
    def __init__(self,
                 project_id,
                 model,
                 operation='create',
                 gcp_conn_id='google_cloud_default',
                 delegate_to=None,
                 *args,
                 **kwargs):
        super(MLEngineModelOperator, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self._project_id = project_id
        self._model = model
        self._operation = operation
        self._gcp_conn_id = gcp_conn_id
        self._delegate_to = delegate_to

    def execute(self, context):
        hook = MLEngineHook(
            gcp_conn_id=self._gcp_conn_id, delegate_to=self._delegate_to)
        if self._operation == 'create':
            return hook.create_model(self._project_id, self._model)
        elif self._operation == 'get':
            return hook.get_model(self._project_id, self._model['name'])
        else:
            raise ValueError('Unknown operation: {}'.format(self._operation))


class MLEngineVersionOperator(BaseOperator):
    
    template_fields = [
        '_model_name',
        '_version_name',
        '_version',
    ]

    @apply_defaults
    def __init__(self,
                 project_id,
                 model_name,
                 version_name=None,
                 version=None,
                 operation='create',
                 gcp_conn_id='google_cloud_default',
                 delegate_to=None,
                 *args,
                 **kwargs):

        super(MLEngineVersionOperator, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self._project_id = project_id
        self._model_name = model_name
        self._version_name = version_name
        self._version = version or {}
        self._operation = operation
        self._gcp_conn_id = gcp_conn_id
        self._delegate_to = delegate_to

    def execute(self, context):
        if 'name' not in self._version:
            self._version['name'] = self._version_name

        hook = MLEngineHook(
            gcp_conn_id=self._gcp_conn_id, delegate_to=self._delegate_to)

        if self._operation == 'create':
            assert self._version is not None
            return hook.create_version(self._project_id, self._model_name,
                                       self._version)
        elif self._operation == 'set_default':
            return hook.set_default_version(self._project_id, self._model_name,
                                            self._version['name'])
        elif self._operation == 'list':
            return hook.list_versions(self._project_id, self._model_name)
        elif self._operation == 'delete':
            return hook.delete_version(self._project_id, self._model_name,
                                       self._version['name'])
        else:
            raise ValueError('Unknown operation: {}'.format(self._operation))


class MLEngineTrainingOperator(BaseOperator):
    
    template_fields = [
        '_project_id',
        '_job_id',
        '_package_uris',
        '_training_python_module',
        '_training_args',
        '_region',
        '_scale_tier',
        '_runtime_version',
        '_python_version',
        '_job_dir'
    ]

    @apply_defaults
    def __init__(self,
                 project_id,
                 job_id,
                 package_uris,
                 training_python_module,
                 training_args,
                 region,
                 scale_tier=None,
                 runtime_version=None,
                 python_version=None,
                 job_dir=None,
                 gcp_conn_id='google_cloud_default',
                 delegate_to=None,
                 mode='PRODUCTION',
                 *args,
                 **kwargs):
        super(MLEngineTrainingOperator, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self._project_id = project_id
        self._job_id = job_id
        self._package_uris = package_uris
        self._training_python_module = training_python_module
        self._training_args = training_args
        self._region = region
        self._scale_tier = scale_tier
        self._runtime_version = runtime_version
        self._python_version = python_version
        self._job_dir = job_dir
        self._gcp_conn_id = gcp_conn_id
        self._delegate_to = delegate_to
        self._mode = mode

        if not self._project_id:
            raise AirflowException('Google Cloud project id is required.')
        if not self._job_id:
            raise AirflowException(
                'An unique job id is required for Google MLEngine training '
                'job.')
        if not package_uris:
            raise AirflowException(
                'At least one python package is required for MLEngine '
                'Training job.')
        if not training_python_module:
            raise AirflowException(
                'Python module name to run after installing required '
                'packages is required.')
        if not self._region:
            raise AirflowException('Google Compute Engine region is required.')

    def execute(self, context):
        job_id = _normalize_mlengine_job_id(self._job_id)
        training_request = {
            'jobId': job_id,
            'trainingInput': {
                'scaleTier': self._scale_tier,
                'packageUris': self._package_uris,
                'pythonModule': self._training_python_module,
                'region': self._region,
                'args': self._training_args,
            }
        }

        if self._runtime_version:
            training_request['trainingInput']['runtimeVersion'] = self._runtime_version

        if self._python_version:
            training_request['trainingInput']['pythonVersion'] = self._python_version

        if self._job_dir:
            training_request['trainingInput']['jobDir'] = self._job_dir

        if self._mode == 'DRY_RUN':
            self.log.info('In dry_run mode.')
            self.log.info('MLEngine Training job request is: {}'.format(
                training_request))
            return

        hook = MLEngineHook(
            gcp_conn_id=self._gcp_conn_id, delegate_to=self._delegate_to)

        # Helper method to check if the existing job's training input is the
        # same as the request we get here.
        def check_existing_job(existing_job):
            return existing_job.get('trainingInput', None) == \
                training_request['trainingInput']

        try:
            finished_training_job = hook.create_job(
                self._project_id, training_request, check_existing_job)
        except errors.HttpError:
            raise

        if finished_training_job['state'] != 'SUCCEEDED':
            self.log.error('MLEngine training job failed: {}'.format(
                str(finished_training_job)))
            raise RuntimeError(finished_training_job['errorMessage'])

Import variables from composer_conf.json file into Airflow Variables.
Go to Airflow WebUI → Admin → Variables → Browse to file path or configure variables manually.
Please place the following in composer_conf

{
  "mongo_conf": {
    "host": "mongodb://<instance-internal-ip>:27017",
    "db_name": "DBNAME",
    "table_name": "TABLENAME",
    "file_prefix": "Folder In GCS Bucket",
    "bq_dataset": "BigQuery Dataset",
    "bucket_name": "GCS Bucket",
    "tot_data": "yes",
    "ml_configuration": {
      "BUCKET_NAME": "GCS Bucket",
      "BASE_DIR": "gs://GCS Bucket/machine_learning/",
      "PACKAGE_NAME": "PACKAGE NAME FROM setup.py FILE in ML",
      "TRAINER_MODULE": "trainer.train",
      "RUNTIME_VERSION": "1.13",
      "PROJECT_ID": "GCP Project",
      "MODEL_FILE_BUCKET": "BUCKET CREATED BY Composer Environment",
      "MODEL_FILE_LOCATION": "data/MODEL LOCATION FILE",
      "MODEL_NAME": "MODEL_NAME"
    }
  }

Please store any configuration files or credentials file that are used by Composer in the data folder in the bucket created by Composer environment.

After configuring variables accordingly, you can see the DAG named ml_pipeline in the Airflow WebUI.

Please trigger the DAG file from Airflow WebUI. Once the DAG ran successfully. It looks like the following:

Thanks for the read and look forward to your comments.

This story is authored by PV Subbareddy. Subbareddy is a Big Data Engineer specializing on Cloud Big Data Services and Apache Spark Ecosystem.

Face Recognition App In React Native using AWS Rekognition

In this blog we are going to build an app for registering faces and verifying faces using Amazon Rekognition in React Native.

Installing dependencies:

Let’s go to React Native Docs, select React Native CLI Quickstart and select our appropriate Development OS and the Target OS as Android, as we are going to build an android application.

Follow the docs for installing dependencies, after installing create a new React Native Application. Use the command line interface to generate a new React Native project called FaceRegister.

react-native init FaceRegister

Preparing the Android device:

We shall need an Android device to run our React Native Android app. This can be either a physical Android device, or more commonly, we can use an Android Virtual Device (AVD) which allows us to emulate an Android device on our computer (using Android Studio).

Either way, we shall need to prepare the device to run Android apps for development.
If you have a physical Android device, you can use it for development in place of an AVD by connecting it to your computer using a USB cable and following the instructions here.

If you are using a virtual device follow this link. I shall be using physical android device.
Now go to the command line and run react-native run-android inside your React Native app directory:

cd FaceRegister
react-native run-android

If everything is set up correctly, you should see your new app running in your physical device or Android emulator.

In your system, you should see a folder named FaceRegister created. Now open FaceRegister folder with your favorite code editor and create a file called Register.js. We need an input box for the username or id for referring the image and a placeholder to preview the captured image and a submit button to register.

Open your Register.js file and copy the below code:

import React from 'react';
import { StyleSheet, View, Text, TextInput, Image, ScrollView, TouchableHighlight } from 'react-native';

class LoginScreen extends React.Component {
    constructor(props){
       super(props);
       this.state =  {
           username : '',
           capturedImage : ''
       };
   }

  
   render() {
       return (
           <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
               <ScrollView>
                   <Text style= {{ fontSize: 20, color: "#000", textAlign: 'center', marginBottom: 15, marginTop: 10 }}>Register Face</Text>
              
                   <TextInput
                       placeholder="Enter Username"
                       onChangeText={UserName => this.setState({username: UserName})}
                       underlineColorAndroid='transparent'
                       style={styles.TextInputStyleClass}
                   />
                   {this.state.capturedImage !== "" && <View style={styles.imageholder} >
                       <Image source={{uri : this.state.capturedImage}} style={styles.previewImage} />
                   </View>}
                  

                   <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.captureButton]}>
                       <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Capture Image</Text>
                   </TouchableHighlight>

                   <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.submitButton]}>
                       <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Submit</Text>
                   </TouchableHighlight>
               </ScrollView>
           </View>
       );
   }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
   MainContainer: {
       marginTop: 60
   },
   TextInputStyleClass: {
     textAlign: 'center',
     marginBottom: 7,
     height: 40,
     borderWidth: 1,
     margin: 10,
     borderColor: '#D0D0D0',
     borderRadius: 5 ,
   },
   inputContainer: {
     borderBottomColor: '#F5FCFF',
     backgroundColor: '#FFFFFF',
     borderRadius:30,
     borderBottomWidth: 1,
     width:300,
     height:45,
     marginBottom:20,
     flexDirection: 'row',
     alignItems:'center'
   },
   buttonContainer: {
     height:45,
     flexDirection: 'row',
     alignItems: 'center',
     justifyContent: 'center',
     marginBottom:20,
     width:"80%",
     borderRadius:30,
     marginTop: 20,
     marginLeft: 5,
   },
   captureButton: {
     backgroundColor: "#337ab7",
     width: 350,
   },
   buttonText: {
     color: 'white',
     fontWeight: 'bold',
   },
   horizontal: {
     flexDirection: 'row',
     justifyContent: 'space-around',
     padding: 10
   },
   submitButton: {
     backgroundColor: "#C0C0C0",
     width: 350,
     marginTop: 5,
   },
   imageholder: {
     borderWidth: 1,
     borderColor: "grey",
     backgroundColor: "#eee",
     width: "50%",
     height: 150,
     marginTop: 10,
     marginLeft: 90,
     flexDirection: 'row',
     alignItems:'center'
   },
   previewImage: {
     width: "100%",
     height: "100%",
   }
});

export default LoginScreen;

Now import your Register file in your App.js file which is located in your project root folder. Open your App.js file and replace it with the below code:

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import {View} from 'react-native';
import LoginScreen from './LoginScreen';

class App extends Component {
   render() {
       return (
       <View>
           <LoginScreen />
       </View>
       );
   }
}

export default App;

Now run your app again. Run below command in the project directory:

react-native run-android

You can see a Text input for username and two buttons one(Capture image) for capturing an image and another(Submit) for submitting the details as shown below:

Let’s add the functionality to preview the captured image. We have a package called react-native-image-picker that enables to capture a picture from the device’s camera or to upload an image from the gallery. Go to the command line, in the project directory run the below command to install react-native-image-picker library:

yarn add react-native-image-picker || npm install --save react-native-image-picker

react-native link react-native-image-picker

Add the required permissions in the AndroidManifest.xml file which is located at android/app/src/main/:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.CAMERA" />
<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE"/>

For more information about this package follow this link.
Now add the below code in your Register.js file.

import React from 'react';
...
...
import ImagePicker from "react-native-image-picker"; //import this

class LoginScreen extends React.Component {
    constructor(props){
      ...
   }

//Add the below method...

   captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
       ImagePicker.showImagePicker({title: "Pick an Image", maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600}, (response) => {
           console.log('Response = ', response);
           // alert(response)
           if (response.didCancel) {
               console.log('User cancelled image picker');
           } else if (response.error) {
               console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
           } else if (response.customButton) {
               console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
           } else {
               // You can also display the image using data:
               const source = { uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data };
          
               this.setState({capturedImage: response.uri, base64String: source.uri });
           }
       });
   }
  
   render() {
       return (
           <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
               ...
               ...
             // Add onPress property to capture image button //
           
              <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.loginButton]} onPress={this.captureImageButtonHandler}>
                       <Text style={styles.loginText}>Capture Image</Text>
               </TouchableHighlight>
              ...
              ...   
           </View>
       );
   }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
...
...
...

});

export default LoginScreen;

Add the captureImageButtonHandler() method in the file and add the onPress property to Capture Image button to call this method. After updating the code, reload your app. Now you can access your camera and gallery by clicking on the Capture Image button. Once you capture an image you can see the preview of that image on your screen as below:

Now we need to register the captured image by storing it in S3 bucket.

I have created an API in API Gateway from AWS console which invokes a lambda function (register-face). All I have to do is to send a POST request to the API url endpoint from client-side.

In the below image I created two resources one for adding faces and another for searching face:

This is the lambda function called register-face that is invoked when we click on the Submit button.

const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
var rekognition = new AWS.Rekognition()
var s3Bucket = new AWS.S3( { params: {Bucket: "<bucket-name>"} } );
var fs = require('fs');

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    let parsedData = JSON.parse(event)
    let encodedImage = parsedData.Image;
    var filePath = "registered/" + parsedData.name;
    console.log(filePath)
    let decodedImage = new Buffer(encodedImage.replace(/^data:image\/\w+;base64,/, ""),'base64')
    var data = {
        Key: filePath, 
        Body: decodedImage,
        ContentEncoding: 'base64',
        ContentType: 'image/jpeg'
    };
    s3Bucket.putObject(data, function(err, data){
        if (err) { 
            console.log('Error uploading data: ', data);
            callback(err, null);
        } else {
            console.log('succesfully uploaded the image!');
            callback(null, data);
        }
    });
};

In the above code, I am storing the image in the registered folder (prefix) in the S3 bucket.

Just uploading faces in S3 bucket is not enough, we need to create a collection in an AWS region to store the registered faces from S3 bucket. Because we also need to add the verification or recognition process whether the face is registered or not. For that, we shall be using Amazon Rekognition to search faces in the collection. In Amazon Rekognition there is an operation called SearchFacesByImage which searches the image from the collection. Go through the Searching Faces in a Collection to know more. 
Add the below code to the register-face lambda function.

var params ={
        CollectionId: "<collection-id>", 
        DetectionAttributes: [], 
        ExternalImageId: parsedData.name, 
        Image: {
            S3Object: {
                Bucket: "<bucket-name>", 
                Name: filePath
            }
        }
    }
    setTimeout(function () {
        rekognition.indexFaces(params, function(err, data) {
            if (err){
                console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
                callback(err)
            }
            else{
                console.log(data); // successful response
                callback(null,data);
            }
        });
    }, 3000);

So, the final lambda function looks as below:

const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
var rekognition = new AWS.Rekognition()
var s3Bucket = new AWS.S3( { params: {Bucket: "<bucket-name>"} } );
var fs = require('fs');

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    console.log(event);
    console.log(typeof event);
    console.log(JSON.parse(event));
    let parsedData = JSON.parse(event)
    let encodedImage = parsedData.Image;
    var filePath = "registered/" + parsedData.name;
    console.log(filePath)
    let buf = new Buffer(encodedImage.replace(/^data:image\/\w+;base64,/, ""),'base64')
    var data = {
        Key: filePath, 
        Body: buf,
        ContentEncoding: 'base64',
        ContentType: 'image/jpeg'
    };
    s3Bucket.putObject(data, function(err, data){
        if (err) { 
            console.log('Error uploading data: ', data);
            callback(err, null);
        } else {
            console.log('succesfully uploaded the image!');
            // callback(null, data);
        }
    });
    var params ={
        CollectionId: "face-collection", 
        DetectionAttributes: [], 
        ExternalImageId: parsedData.name, 
        Image: {
            S3Object: {
                Bucket: "face-recognise-test", 
                Name: filePath
            }
        }
    }
    setTimeout(function () {
        rekognition.indexFaces(params, function(err, data) {
            if (err){
                console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
                callback(err)
            }
            else{
                console.log(data);           // successful response
                callback(null,data);
            }
        });
    }, 3000);
};

In this lambda function initially, I’m storing the image(face) in S3 bucket and then adding the same face to collection from S3 bucket.

Let’s get back to our client-side and install the aws-amplify library in our project root directory from the command line with below commands:

npm install --save aws-amplify
npm install --save aws-amplify-react-native
(or)
yarn add aws-amplify
yarn add aws-amplify-react-native

Now add the below code in Register.js file:

import React from 'react';
...
...
import Amplify, {API} from "aws-amplify";
Amplify.configure({
   API: {
       endpoints: [
           {
               name: "<API-name>",
               endpoint: "<your endpoint url>"
           }
       ]
   }
});

class Registration extends React.Component {
    constructor(props){
      ...
      ...
    }
   submitButtonHandler = () => {
       if (this.state.username == '' || this.state.username == undefined || this.state.username == null) {
           alert("Please Enter the Username");
       } else if (this.state.userId == '' || this.state.userId == undefined || this.state.userId == null) {
           alert("Please Enter the UserId");
       } else if(this.state.capturedImage == '' || this.state.capturedImage == undefined || this.state.capturedImage == null) {
           alert("Please Capture the Image");
       } else {
           const apiName = "<API-name>";
           const path = "<your path>";
           const init = {
               headers : {
                   'Accept': 'application/json',
                   "X-Amz-Target": "RekognitionService.IndexFaces",
                   "Content-Type": "application/x-amz-json-1.1"
               },
               body : JSON.stringify({
                   Image: this.state.base64String,
                   name: this.state.username
               })
           }
          
           API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
               alert(JSON.stringify(response))
           });
       }
   }
   
   render() {
       if(this.state.image!=="") {
           // alert(this.state.image)
       }
       return (
           <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
               <ScrollView>
...
...

                   <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.signupButton]} onPress={this.submitButtonHandler}>
                       <Text style={styles.signupText}>Submit</Text>
                   </TouchableHighlight>
...
...   
            </ScrollView>
           </View>
       );
   }
}

In the above code, we added configuration to the API Gateway using amplify and created a method called submitButtonHandler() where we are going to do a POST request to the lambda function to register the face when the user clicks on the submit button. So, we have added the onPress property to submit button which calls the submitButtonHandler().

Here is the complete code for Register.js file:

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import { StyleSheet, View, Text, TextInput, Image, ScrollView, TouchableHighlight } from 'react-native';
import ImagePicker from "react-native-image-picker";
import Amplify, {API} from "aws-amplify";
Amplify.configure({
    API: {
        endpoints: [
            {
                name: "<api-name>",
                Endpoint: "<your endpoint url>"
            }
        ]
    }
});

class Registration extends Component {
  
    constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.state =  {
            username : '',
            capturedImage : ''
        };
        // this.submitButtonHandler = this.submitButtonHandler.bind(this);
    }

    captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
        ImagePicker.showImagePicker({title: "Pick an Image", maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600}, (response) => {
            console.log('Response = ', response);
            // alert(response)
            if (response.didCancel) {
                console.log('User cancelled image picker');
            } else if (response.error) {
                console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
            } else if (response.customButton) {
                console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
            } else {
                // You can also display the image using data:
                const source = { uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data };
            
                this.setState({capturedImage: response.uri, base64String: source.uri });
            }
        });
    }

    submitButtonHandler = () => {
        if (this.state.username == '' || this.state.username == undefined || this.state.username == null) {
            alert("Please Enter the Username");
        } else if(this.state.capturedImage == '' || this.state.capturedImage == undefined || this.state.capturedImage == null) {
            alert("Please Capture the Image");
        } else {
            const apiName = "<api-name>";
            const path = "<your path>";
            const init = {
                headers : {
                    'Accept': 'application/json',
                    "X-Amz-Target": "RekognitionService.IndexFaces",
                    "Content-Type": "application/x-amz-json-1.1"
                },
                body : JSON.stringify({ 
                    Image: this.state.base64String,
                    name: this.state.username
                })
            }
            
            API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
                alert(response);
            });
        }
    }

    render() {
        if(this.state.image!=="") {
            // alert(this.state.image)
        }
        return (
            <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
                <ScrollView>
                    <Text style= {{ fontSize: 20, color: "#000", textAlign: 'center', marginBottom: 15, marginTop: 10 }}>Register Face</Text>
                
                    <TextInput
                        placeholder="Enter Username"
                        onChangeText={UserName => this.setState({username: UserName})}
                        underlineColorAndroid='transparent'
                        style={styles.TextInputStyleClass}
                    />


                    {this.state.capturedImage !== "" && <View style={styles.imageholder} >
                        <Image source={{uri : this.state.capturedImage}} style={styles.previewImage} />
                    </View>}

                    <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.captureButton]} onPress={this.captureImageButtonHandler}>
                        <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Capture Image</Text>
                    </TouchableHighlight>

                    <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.submitButton]} onPress={this.submitButtonHandler}>
                        <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Submit</Text>
                    </TouchableHighlight>
                </ScrollView>
            </View>
        );
    }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
    TextInputStyleClass: {
      textAlign: 'center',
      marginBottom: 7,
      height: 40,
      borderWidth: 1,
      margin: 10,
      borderColor: '#D0D0D0',
      borderRadius: 5 ,
    },
    inputContainer: {
      borderBottomColor: '#F5FCFF',
      backgroundColor: '#FFFFFF',
      borderRadius:30,
      borderBottomWidth: 1,
      width:300,
      height:45,
      marginBottom:20,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems:'center'
    },
    buttonContainer: {
      height:45,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems: 'center',
      justifyContent: 'center',
      marginBottom:20,
      width:"80%",
      borderRadius:30,
      marginTop: 20,
      marginLeft: 5,
    },
    captureButton: {
      backgroundColor: "#337ab7",
      width: 350,
    },
    buttonText: {
      color: 'white',
      fontWeight: 'bold',
    },
    horizontal: {
      flexDirection: 'row',
      justifyContent: 'space-around',
      padding: 10
    },
    submitButton: {
      backgroundColor: "#C0C0C0",
      width: 350,
      marginTop: 5,
    },
    imageholder: {
      borderWidth: 1,
      borderColor: "grey",
      backgroundColor: "#eee",
      width: "50%",
      height: 150,
      marginTop: 10,
      marginLeft: 90,
      flexDirection: 'row',
      alignItems:'center'
    },
    previewImage: {
      width: "100%",
      height: "100%",
    }
});

export default Registration;

Now reload your application and register the image(face).

After registering successfully you will receive an alert message as below:

Now go to your S3 bucket and check if the image is stored as below:

And also check in your collection using below command from your command line:

aws rekognition list-faces --collection-id "<your collection id>"

You will get a JSON data with list of faces that are registered as output. So, the registration process is working successfully. Now we need to add the verification/searchface process to our application. I created another lambda function (searchFace) for face verification. Here is the code for face verification lambda function.

const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
var rekognition = new AWS.Rekognition()
var s3Bucket = new AWS.S3( { params: {Bucket: "<bucket-name>"} } );
var fs = require('fs');

exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    let parsedData = JSON.parse(event)
    let encodedImage = parsedData.Image;
    var filePath = parsedData.name + ".jpg";
    console.log(filePath)
    let decodedImage = new Buffer(encodedImage.replace(/^data:image\/\w+;base64,/, ""),'base64')
    var data = {
        Key: filePath, 
        Body: decodedImage,
        ContentEncoding: 'base64',
        ContentType: 'image/jpeg'
    };
    s3Bucket.putObject(data, function(err, data){
        if (err) { 
            console.log('Error uploading data: ', data);
            callback(err);
        } else {
            console.log('succesfully uploaded the image!');
            // callback(null, data);
        }
    });
    var params2 ={
        CollectionId: "<collectio-id>", 
        FaceMatchThreshold: 85, 
        Image: {
            S3Object: {
                Bucket: "<bucket-name>", 
                Name: filePath
            }
        }, 
        MaxFaces: 5
    }
    setTimeout(function () {
        rekognition.searchFacesByImage(params2, function(err, data) {
            if (err){
                console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
                callback(err)
            }
            else{
                console.log(data);           // successful response
                callback(null,data);
            }
        });
    }, 2000);
};

In the above lambda function, we are using SearchFacesByImage. It searches the image from the collection. The response will be a JSON object. Now create a new file called Verification.js in your project root directory and copy the below code in it:

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import { StyleSheet, View, Text, TextInput, Image, ScrollView, TouchableHighlight } from 'react-native';
import ImagePicker from "react-native-image-picker";
import Amplify, {API} from "aws-amplify";
Amplify.configure({
   API: {
       endpoints: [
           {
               name: "<API-name>",
               endpoint: "<your endpoint url>"
           }
       ]
   }
});

class Verification extends Component {
    constructor(props){
       super(props);
       this.state =  {
           username: ''
           capturedImage : ''
       };
   }

   captureImageButtonHandler = () => {
       ImagePicker.showImagePicker({title: "Pick an Image", maxWidth: 800, maxHeight: 600}, (response) => {
           console.log('Response = ', response);
           // alert(response)
           if (response.didCancel) {
               console.log('User cancelled image picker');
           } else if (response.error) {
               console.log('ImagePicker Error: ', response.error);
           } else if (response.customButton) {
               console.log('User tapped custom button: ', response.customButton);
           } else {
               // You can also display the image using data:
               const source = { uri: 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + response.data };
          
               this.setState({capturedImage: response.uri, base64String: source.uri });
           }
       });
   }

   verification = () => {
       if(this.state.capturedImage == '' || this.state.capturedImage == undefined || this.state.capturedImage == null) {
           alert("Please Capture the Image");
       } else {
           const apiName = "<api-name>";
           const path = "<your path>";
          
           const init = {
               headers : {
                   'Accept': 'application/json',
                   "X-Amz-Target": "RekognitionService.SearchFacesByImage",
                   "Content-Type": "application/x-amz-json-1.1"
               },
               body : JSON.stringify({
                   Image: this.state.base64String,
                   name: this.state.username
               })
           }
          
           API.post(apiName, path, init).then(response => {
               if(JSON.stringify(response.FaceMatches.length) > 0) {
                   alert(response.FaceMatches[0].Face.ExternalImageId)
               } else {
                   alert("No matches found.")
               }
           });
       }
   }

  
  
    render() {
       if(this.state.image!=="") {
           // alert(this.state.image)
       }
       return (
           <View style={styles.MainContainer}>
               <ScrollView>
                   <Text style= {{ fontSize: 20, color: "#000", textAlign: 'center', marginBottom: 15, marginTop: 10 }}>Verify Face</Text>
              
                   {this.state.capturedImage !== "" && <View style={styles.imageholder} >
                       <Image source={{uri : this.state.capturedImage}} style={styles.previewImage} />
                   </View>}

                   <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.captureButton]} onPress={this.captureImageButtonHandler}>
                       <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Capture Image</Text>
                   </TouchableHighlight>

                   <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.verifyButton]} onPress={this.verification}>
                       <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Verify</Text>
                   </TouchableHighlight>
               </ScrollView>
           </View>
       );
   }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
   container: {
     flex: 1,
     backgroundColor: 'white',
     alignItems: 'center',
     justifyContent: 'center',
   },
   buttonContainer: {
     height:45,
     flexDirection: 'row',
     alignItems: 'center',
     justifyContent: 'center',
     marginBottom:20,
     width:"80%",
     borderRadius:30,
     marginTop: 20,
     marginLeft: 5,
   },
   captureButton: {
     backgroundColor: "#337ab7",
     width: 350,
   },
   buttonText: {
     color: 'white',
     fontWeight: 'bold',
   },
   verifyButton: {
     backgroundColor: "#C0C0C0",
     width: 350,
     marginTop: 5,
   },
   imageholder: {
     borderWidth: 1,
     borderColor: "grey",
     backgroundColor: "#eee",
     width: "50%",
     height: 150,
     marginTop: 10,
     marginLeft: 90,
     flexDirection: 'row',
     alignItems:'center'
   },
   previewImage: {
     width: "100%",
     height: "100%",
   }
});

export default Verification;

In the above code there are two buttons one (Capture image) for capturing the face that needs to be verified and another (Verify) for verifying the captured face if it is registered or not. When a user clicks on Verify button verification() method will be called in which we make a POST request (invoking searchFace lambda function via API gateway).

Now we are having two screens one for Registration and another for Verification.Let’s add navigation between two screens using react-navigation. The first step is to install react-navigation in your project:

npm install --save react-navigation

The second step is to install react-native-gesture-handler:

yarn add react-native-gesture-handler
# or with npm
# npm install --save react-native-gesture-handler

Now we need to link our react-native with react-native-gesture-handler:

react-native link react-native-gesture-handler

After that go back to your App.js file and replace it with the below code:

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import {View, Text, TouchableHighlight, StyleSheet} from 'react-native';
import Registration from './Registration';
import {createStackNavigator, createAppContainer} from 'react-navigation';
import Verification from './Verification';

class HomeScreen extends React.Component {
   render() {
       return (
           <View style={{ flex: 1, alignItems: "center" }}>
               <Text style= {{ fontSize: 30, color: "#000", marginBottom: 50, marginTop: 100 }}>Register Face ID</Text>
               <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.button]} onPress={() => this.props.navigation.navigate('Registration')}>
                   <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Registration</Text>
               </TouchableHighlight>
               <TouchableHighlight style={[styles.buttonContainer, styles.button]} onPress={() => this.props.navigation.navigate('Verification')}>
                   <Text style={styles.buttonText}>Verification</Text>
               </TouchableHighlight>
           </View>
       );
   }
}

const MainNavigator = createStackNavigator(
   {
       Home: {screen: HomeScreen},
       Registration: {screen: Registration},
       Verification: {screen: Verification}
   },
   {
       initialRouteName: 'Home',
   }
);

const AppContainer = createAppContainer(MainNavigator);

export default class App extends Component {
   render() {
       return <AppContainer />;
   }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
   buttonContainer: {
       height:45,
       flexDirection: 'row',
       alignItems: 'center',
       justifyContent: 'center',
       marginBottom:20,
       width:"80%",
       borderRadius:30,
       marginTop: 20,
       marginLeft: 5,
   },
   button: {
       backgroundColor: "#337ab7",
       width: 350,
       marginTop: 5,
   },
   buttonText: {
       color: 'white',
       fontWeight: 'bold',
   },
})

Now reload your app and you could see your home screen as below:

When user clicks on Registration button it navigates to Registration screen as below:

When user clicks on Verification button it navigates to Verification screen as below:

Now let’s check the verification process.

Step 1: Navigate to Verification screen.

Step 2: Capture the registered image(face).

Step 3: Click on the verify button.

If everything is fine then you will receive an alert message with the face name as below:

If there are no face matches with the captured face then the user receives an alert message as “No matches found”.

Thanks for the read, I hope it was useful.

This story is authored by Venu Vaka. Venu is a software engineer and machine learning enthusiast.

Creating an Automated Data Engineering Pipeline for Batch Data in Machine Learning

A common use case in Machine Learning life cycle is to have access to the latest training data so as to prevent model deterioration. A lot of times data scientists find it cumbersome to manually export data from data sources such as relational databases or NoSQL data stores or even distributed data. This necessitates automating the data engineering pipeline in Machine Learning. In this post, we will describe how to set up this pipeline for batch data. This workflow is orchestrated via Airflow and can be set up to run at regular intervals: such as hourly, daily, weekly, etc depending on the specific business requirements.

Quick note – In case you are interested in building a real time data engineering pipeline for ML, please look at this post.

In this use case, we are going to export MongoDB data into Google BigQuery via Cloud Storage. The updated data in BigQuery is then made available in Jupyter Notebook as a Pandas Dataframe for downstream model building and analytics. As the pipeline automates the data ingestion and preprocessing, the data scientists always have access to the latest batch data in their Jupyter Notebooks hosted on Google AI Platform. 

We have a MongoDB service running in an instance and we have Airflow and mongoexport running on docker on another instance. Mongoexport is a utility that produces a JSON or CSV export of data stored in MongoDB. Now the data in MongoDB shall be extracted and transformed using mongoexport and loaded into CloudStorage. Airflow is used to schedule and orchestrate these exports. Once the data is available in CloudStorage it could be queried in BigQuery. We then get this data from BigQuery to Jupyter Notebook. Following is a step by step sequence of steps to set up this data pipeline.

You can create an instance in GCP by going to Compute Engine. Click on create instance.

Install.sh:

sudo apt-get update
curl -fsSL https://get.docker.com -o get-docker.sh
sh get-docker.sh
sudo usermod -aG docker $USER
sudo apt-get install -y python-pip
export AIRFLOW_HOME=~/airflow
sudo pip install apache-airflow
sudo pip install apache-airflow[postgres,s3]
airflow initdb
airflow webserver -p 8080 -D
airflow scheduler -D
sudo docker pull mongo
sudo docker run --name mongo_client -d mongo

Please run the install.sh file using ./install.sh command (please make sure file is executable), which would install Docker, Airflow, pulls Mongo image and runs the mongo image in a container named mongo_client.

After installation, for Airflow webUIhttp://<public-ip-instance>:8080 (You may need to open port 8080 in the network just for your public IP)


Please make sure the Google service account in the running instance must have permissions for accessing Big Query and Cloud Storage. After installation, add the Airflow job Python file (mongo-export.py) inside the airflow/dags folder.

Before running the Python file, please make sure that you create Dataset and create the table in BigQuery. Also change the appropriate values for the MongoDB source database, MongoDB source table, Cloud Storage destination bucket and BigQuery destination dataset in the Airflow job Python file (mongo-export.py). Big Query destination table name is the same as the source table in Mongo DB. 

Mongo-export.py:

import airflow
from airflow import DAG
from airflow.operators.bash_operator import BashOperator
from airflow.operators.python_operator import PythonOperator
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
import json
from pandas.io.json import json_normalize

# Following are default arguments which could be overridden
default_args = {
    'owner': 'airflow',
    'depends_on_past': False,
    'start_date': airflow.utils.dates.days_ago(0),
    'email': ['airflow@gmail.com'],
    'email_on_failure': False,
    'email_on_retry': False,
    'retries': 1,
    'retry_delay': timedelta(minutes=1),
}

bucket_name = '<Your_Bucket>'
db_name = '<Database_Name>'
dataset = '<Dataset_Name>'
table_name = '<Table_Name>'


time_stamp = datetime.now()
cur_date = time_stamp.strftime("%Y-%m-%d")

# It will flatten the nested json
def flatten_json(y):
    out = {}
    def flatten(x, name=''):
        if type(x) is dict:
            for a in x:
                flatten(x[a], name + a + '_')
        elif type(x) is list:
            i = 0
            for a in x:
                flatten(a, name + str(i) + '_')
                i += 1
        else:
            out[name[:-1]] = x

    flatten(y)
    return out

def convert_string(y):
    string_type = {}

    def convert(x, name=''):
        if type(x) is dict:
            for a in x:
                convert(str(x[a]), name + a + '_')
        elif type(x) is list:
            i = 0
            for a in x:
                flatten(a, name + str(i) + '_')
                i += 1
        else:
            string_type[name[:-1]] = x

    convert(y)
    return string_type


def json_flat():
    lines = [line.rstrip('\n') for line in open('/home/dev/'+ table_name + '-unformat.json')]
    flat_list = []
    for line in lines:
        line = line.replace("\"$", "\"")
        line = json.loads(line)
        try:
            flat_list.append(json.dumps(convert_string(flatten_json(line))))
        except Exception as e:
            print(e)
    flatted_json = '\n'.join(i for i in flat_list)

    with open('/home/dev/' + table_name + '.json', 'a') as file:
        file.write(flatted_json)
    return flatted_json 

dag = DAG('mongoexport-daily-gcs-bq', default_args=default_args, params = {'cur_date': cur_date, 'db_name': db_name, 'table_name': table_name, 'dataset': dataset, 'bucket_name': bucket_name})
#exports provide a table data into docker container 
t1 = BashOperator(
    task_id='mongoexport_to_container',
    bash_command='sudo docker exec -i mongo_client sh -c "mongoexport --host=<instance_public_ip> --db {{params.db_name}} --collection {{params.table_name}} --out {{params.table_name}}-unformat.json"',
    dag=dag)

# copies exported file into instance

t2 = BashOperator(
    task_id='cp_from_container_instance',
    bash_command='sudo docker cp mongo_client:/{{params.table_name}}-unformat.json /home/dev/',
    dag=dag)

t3 = PythonOperator(
    task_id='flattening_json',
    python_callable=json_flat,
    dag=dag)
# copies the flatten data from cloud storage
t4 = BashOperator(
    task_id='cp_from_instance_gcs',
    bash_command='gsutil cp /home/dev/{{params.table_name}}.json gs://{{params.bucket_name}}/raw/{{params.table_name}}/date={{params.cur_date}}/',
    dag=dag)
# 
t5 = BashOperator(
    task_id='cp_from_instance_gcs_daily_data',
    bash_command='gsutil cp /home/dev/{{params.table_name}}.json gs://{{params.bucket_name}}/curated/{{params.table_name}}/',
    dag=dag)

# removes the existing bigquery table
t6 = BashOperator(
    task_id='remove_bq_table',
    bash_command='bq rm -f {{params.dataset}}.{{params.table_name}}',
    dag=dag)
# creates a table in bigquery
t7 = BashOperator(
    task_id='create_bq_table',
    bash_command='bq load --autodetect --source_format=NEWLINE_DELIMITED_JSON {{params.dataset}}.{{params.table_name}} gs://{{params.bucket_name}}/curated/{{params.table_name}}/{{params.table_name}}.json',
    dag=dag)
# removes data from container
t8 = BashOperator(
    task_id='remove_file_from_container',
    bash_command='sudo docker exec -i mongo_client sh -c "rm -rf {{params.table_name}}*.json"',
    dag=dag)
# removes data from instance
t9 = BashOperator(
    task_id='remove_file_from_instance',
    bash_command='rm -rf /home/dev/{{params.table_name}}*.json',
    dag=dag)

t1 >> t2
t2 >> t3
t3 >> [t4, t5]
[t4, t5] >> t6
t6 >> t7
t7 >> [t8, t9]

Then run the python file using python <file-path>.py  

(example: python airflow/dags/mongo-export.py).

After running the python file, the dag name shows in Airflow webUI. And you could trigger the dag manually. Please make sure toggle button is in ON status

Once the job completes, the data is stored in the bucket and also available in the destination table in BigQuery. You could see the table is created in BigQuery. Click on querytable to perform SQL operations and you could see your results in the preview tab at the bottom.

Now, you could access the data in Jupyter Notebook from BigQuery. Search for notebook in GCP console. 

Run the below commands in Jupyter Notebook.

from google.cloud import bigquery
client = bigquery.Client()
sql = """
SELECT * FROM 
`<project-name>.<dataset-name>.<table-name>`
"""
df = client.query(sql).to_dataframe()
df.head(10)

This loads the BigQuery data into Pandas dataframe and can be used for model creation as required. Later when the data pipeline is run as per schedule, the refreshed data would automatically be available in this Jupyter notebook via this SQL query.

Hope this helps you to automate your batch Data Engineering pipeline for Machine Learning. 

This story is co-authored by Santosh and Subbareddy. Santosh is an AWS Cloud Engineer and Subbareddy is a Big Data Engineer.